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Sponsor Post: North Harbour Heritage Park to open in late 2019

The North Harbour Heritage Park is a new community attraction comprising a vast expanse of parkland, river access including a canoe launch/fishing platform and an interpretive centre focusing on the heritage aspect of the site.

The Heritage Park is a 3 year project which on completion at the end of 2019, will have invested over $3m, with $1,535,062 of funds coming from the Federal Government through a funding agreement with the Abbey Museum of Art and Archaeology. Funding is through the Community Development Grants programme, provided through the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development. The $1,535,062 Grant has been matched by North Harbour. The Abbey Museum and North Harbour are also working in partnership and providing significant in-kind support through project planning, project management, post-construction operation and maintenance.

The first stages of construction were completed in 2018, including roads and other infrastructure including picnic areas with shelters, BBQs, tables and benches and toilet facilities. As work progresses, the team is working to ensure the heritage remains are preserved and available for viewing and enjoyment by the general public.

Project Manager Bryan Finney said, “Construction is progressing well, we expect to start work on the interpretive building in the next few weeks. Work is also progressing on the Park infrastructure which includes a 1.5km walking track around the lake. As part of this work, the archaeologists monitoring construction have uncovered building foundations that were not previously known.

“We’re hoping to begin allowing public access by around the middle of the year with an official opening sometime in the second half of 2019.”

Retaining and preserving the historical remnants of the North Harbour site has been an important part of the North Harbour planning process. Following an application process initiated by the developers of North Harbour, the area has been listed and protected on the Queensland Heritage Register since 2011 as a place of Queensland State significance.

North Harbour’s Heritage Expert is Steve Chaddock from Timeline Heritage who is working with a team of archaeologists at the remains of the “Moray Fields” property that was built by George Raff at what is now the North Harbour site. Steve said: “We are looking to carefully record the exposed areas of the old house and its outbuildings and yards so that we can later interpret that to the public and in advance of a tree management program aiming to preserve the State Listed archaeological remains.”

The history of the site will be interpreted from a dedicated “interpretive centre” that delivers a ‘mind map’ of the site before it is experienced first-hand. The facility will present historic photographs, sketches and display objects which will allow visitors to appreciate the stories and significant developments from the past up to the present day.

Interpretation delivery will be provided in the landscape alongside a network of heritage trails and using static signage as well as digital content for mobile devices. The delivery of interpretation will be aimed at school-aged students as well as local, state and international visitors learning about local history and South Sea Islander heritage.

On a broader community level, the South Sea Islander history of the site has presented an opportunity to recognise the contribution made by past generations of South Sea Islanders and provide a tangible, visitable focus for the Island and Australian South Sea Islander community and their descendants. Space is made available for the South Sea Islander community to remember their ancestors at this place.

The Heritage Park area is currently able to be accessed on Saturday mornings at 7.00am for those participating in the free, weekly North Harbour River parkrun. Check out the Facebook page for more information, including directions.

Find North Harbour

North Harbour’s Sales and Information Centre & Display Village with café and two playgrounds is open seven days a week, 10am-5pm. Located on the corner of Buckley Road and Fraser Drive, Burpengary East, the Display Village showcases 33 brand new home designs from 17 of Australia’s best builders. North Harbour recently won the UDIA Queensland Award for Best Residential Subdivision and is EnviroDevelopment Accredited.

Visit the North Harbour website for more information on building new houses at North Harbour. Sign up for email updates to keep up to date with the latest news, events and information, including our regular events, or follow us on Facebook.

Hans Electrical Services Sponsor Blog: Medieval Ladies and Apprenticeships

Apprenticeships at Hans Electrical Services, Bribie Island

Hans and electrical apprentice Cassie, at Hans Electrical Services, Bribie Island.

Did apprenticeships exist during medieval times?

And if so were apprenticeships they freely available to all?  During times of war and plague all throughout history women have pulled up their socks and kept society trudging along. A common misconception about women’s roles during these times is that they mainly functioned in supportive roles like housekeeping and child rearing – but their roles were more varied than that.

Being a woman in the Middle Ages

Letters, wills, legal documents and consensus records indicate medieval women’s working role mostly focused on domestic needs. Peasant women were expected to take care of housework as well as help with field work and have a general understanding of medicine to care for the children as well. Servanthood was a common means for women to acquire money for their dowries. In the Middle Ages women were generally maids, merchants or engaged in farm work for those living in rural areas. Their main role in society was to take care of their family including noble women having no choice in a marriage that was based on the family gain.

Medieval apprenticeships for women

In any case skilled trade options for women were available but not to the same freedom as men and most jobs involved living situations with their master as was the custom. Most did not place themselves into apprenticeships without the involvement of a relative and the authorization of a male was common. There were at least three levels in the artisan industry consisting of apprentice, journeyman and master and there is little to no evidence of medieval women reaching a master level. Women often worked in haberdasheries and were hat makers, cobblers, tanners and even silk weavers often training under the master’s wife. In fact, most women were able to work with, and sometimes at the same level as their husbands but some cities and towns excluded women from guilds even the widowers that continued their late husband’s trade work.

Changes in medieval society onward…

Historical research shows that women were not the ‘damsels in distress’ of the Middle Ages that many believed often stepping into to fill gaps in the workforce and that continues to today. They provided the core of the workforce in many trades such as clothing and in the late Middle Ages when the Black Death came, women were predominantly the ones to care for people. Researchers argue that the Black Death held women in their social positions while others claim it advantaged women with more job work opportunities and widows prospered bringing fortune into new marriages which established better treatment for them. In times of war, women are often called upon to fill gaps in manual trade in the absence of enlisted men and in most cases were told to leave their jobs when the men returned.

Ladies in Trade

In 21st Century Australia the number of females learning a trade is steadily on the rise. Bribie Island based, Abbey Medieval Festival sponsors, Hans Electrical, are one of many nationwide businesses encouraging today’s youth to forge a career in the various trade industries.

The Hans Electrical wife and husband team of Petra and Hans Krumbholz are proud to have trained and mentored one of many bright and eager, young female Australian tradies who have gone on to become an example to other young women aspiring to pursue trade career goals. 21 year old Cassandra – the ‘2016 Best Electrical Apprentice’ award winner in her year first joined Hans Electrical as a work experience student. Having completed her 4 year apprenticeship, Cassie  now works alongside her mentor Hans with future plans to begin a Master’s degree and travel.