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Abbey Medieval Festival

These are the top 3 reasons why you should buy Abbey Medieval Festival tickets online.

1) Be an early bird!

Everybody loves to save a few gold coins! By booking your Abbey Medieval Festival tickets online between the 1st February 2015 and the 30th April 2015 you can take advantage of our early bird prices. Why not do a group booking for your friends and family and enjoy the savings!

2) Fast track through the ticket booth

With so many awesome things to explore inside the Abbey Medieval Festival grounds, you want to be able to get your day off and running as quickly as possible! Enjoy the ease and speed of the pre-paid purchase queue like a King!

3) Secure your seat at a medieval banquet

Our famous banquets are well known across the land and as such, we have limited numbers. By purchasing your ticket online you can relax and ready your feasting skills knowing that we have a seat reserved just for you!

Top three reasons to buy your festival tickets online

Hear Ye! Hear Ye! Book your tickets online for a speedy entrance!

So to avoid disappointment, book your Abbey Medieval Festival tickets online here!

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Jouster’s Profiles – Part Two

Second in our Jouster’s Profile series is Vikki Subritzky! Jousting Spectacular introducing Vikki Subritsky

Lady Victoria Subritzky hails from Northland New Zealand.

She is from a distinguished line of noble Polish mounted warriors, and wears light armour very similar to what her fierce ancestor Jan Sobieski wore  in the Great Battle of Grunwald. There, the combined armies of the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania decisively defeated the Teutonic Knights in a bloody battle that saw Jan Sobieski taking out many of the enemies warriors and horses.

Back to the present, Lady Victoria is a member of the International Jousting League, and has been jousting for 15 years. This is her sixth visit to the wonderful Abbey Tournament.

She is part of the jousting team Guild of the Hawk along with fellow Kiwiman John King, and together they regularly perform in various events and take part in many fundraisers for charitable organisations.

At home Lady Victoria breeds and trains sport horses, runs beef cattle and also runs a farm stay holiday, where people can enjoy a sample of rural life.

Her motto – Ancora Imparo – Yet I still learn.

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MEDIEVAL MARKETPLACE: Food, Wine, Weapons and Crafts.

Good morrow, good people. The year 2014 carries us to the 25th anniversary of the annual Abbey Medieval Festival. This silver celebration will see the Medieval Marketplace bustling with excitement as Brave Knights, Warriors and Fair Ladies come from across the ages to choose where to spend their hard earned Gold Pieces. Fill your bellies with food from across the Middle Ages. Find the licensed taverns to enjoy medieval brews. Browse rows of markets to adorn yourselves with various medieval crafts and weaponry. All of our exciting markets will be easy to find with a two page spread in the festival program – read on to get to know what to expect from the Medieval Marketplace.

Melt in your mouth Lamb Shanks from Catering with Flair.

Melt in your mouth Lamb Shanks from Catering with Flair.

The Medieval Marketplace will be brimming with foods from the Middle Ages of Western Europe and the Near East. Imagine the scent of hot baking bread, sizzling whole pig on the spit, lamb shanks, venison, beef, chicken legs and fire grilled sausages. Now, think about a bouquet of spiced vegetables and stews cooked over a hot wood fire. Flavours that have been enjoyed for centuries all come to life at the Abbey. Foods that make the cool Abbey days warm. Taste the sweet delights that have been made with ancient recipes, all perfect for a weekend of medieval faire fun. There are options available for all diets – vegan, vegetarian, gluten free and those with a nagging sweet tooth. No need to pack a lunch, feast at the festival!

The famous Stag Inn - warm fire, food and company!

The famous Stag Inn – warm fire, food and company!

The famous Stag Inn and Friars Folly Tavern will be helping us all to celebrate in fine medieval style. The Stag Inn, found in the main market area, will be serving their renowned array of hot pies, platters and toasted mulled wine, medieval ciders and cordials in a rustic straw laden encampment, complete with fire and wooden tables. At the Jousting end of the festival you’ll find Friars Folly Tavern, positioned right next door to the musical entertainment, Friars Folly is a prime location for merriness and tasting of premium recipes of herbed beer, and it is only a stone’s throw from the Jousting Arena!

The choice of Craft and Weaponry found at the festival makes holding on to Gold Pieces even more difficult than the smell of fresh food. Be prepared to find quality medieval items ranging from superior clothing, home decor, swords, axes, helms, games, jewellery, museum souvenirs and artwork from specialist merchants with the tricks of the trade.

The Medieval Fightclub - your one stop shop for all things weaponry!

The Medieval Fightclub – one stop shop for all things weaponry.

With all of this in mind, be sure to pick up a program at the gates. All of the stalls will be numbered on an easy to use map. The food, craft and licensed areas will be named and numbered, and speciality stalls with vegan, gluten free and vegetarian options highlighted for ease of enjoyment at the festival. We are looking forward to showcasing the finest medieval merchants at the 2014 Abbey Medieval Festival. Help us celebrate the Middle Ages in all of its glory.

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Abbey Medieval Travel Package…in one’s face!

Huzzar! to have so many people interested in the Abbey Medieval Travel Package, we are receiving lots of great feedback. What better experience to look forward to than a short holiday in SE Queensland this winter with your family.

To help you enjoy this experience to its optimum, the Abbey Medieval Travel package is designed to take the hard work out of the planning, leaving you for more time to think about the important things like costumes and food and fun and….perhaps camel rides! And we have purposely excluded flights, simply because it is so easy for people to book their own preferences online. And besides, this is a perfect opportunity to use up those flight gift vouchers you received for Christmas or all those Frequent Flyer points that have been accumulating.

The package includes a fantastic range of room types to suit all budgets with our two accommodation partners, Mon Komo and Gordon Motor inn. It also includes weekend pass to the festival with return transfers from and to your accommodation and airport return transfers. So all you really have to do is ask!

Find out more now and make haste to save disappointment as the package closes on May 5th! And don’t forget to add Medieval Festival and Uplift Tours and Travel to your contact list or those emails containing information that you have requested may end up there!

KMFD2012-CamelAndPonyRides01-BruceLevy

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Children’s Costume Competition

This week we were unfortunately faced with the difficult decision of cancelling our Kids’ Medieval Fun Day. We know that there are many fans out there who, like us, were disappointed with this situation; we want to thank you all for your understanding and support.

Children’s Costume Competition

Costume competitionWe know there are many dedicated parents out there who worked hard creating costumes for little Knights and Princesses to attend the Kids’ Medieval Fun Day. So after a little shuffling around, we are happy to announce that we will have a Children’s Costume Competition this weekend at the Abbey Medieval Festival! Any young Lords and Ladies between the ages of 3 – 12 are welcome to participate in the competition which will be held on stage outside the Friar’s Folly at 12.45 – 1.15pm, We ask that those interested in participating please contact performance@abbeytournament.com.

Fun for the whole family

The Abbey Medieval Festival is a weekend full of workshops, demonstrations and fun for the whole family and we thought we’d share some ideas for the young Lords and Ladies visiting Abbeystowe:

Plan Your Day: Families with Little Kids (aged 0-5)

Plan Your Day: Families with Primary Age Kids (aged 6-11)

Plan Your Day: Families with Teenagers

And parents, don’t miss out on a great offer from Medieval Fightclub! Present your Medieval Fightclub sponsored jousting ticket when purchasing a Toy Sword & Shield Set and they will give you another set FREE! You can find their stall in the market place all weekend.

 

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Counting your cards!

Your favourite Heores and Heroines from the  Abbey Medieval Festival can now be a collected as trading cards.  The cards are a big hit, with online orders flowing in.

Abbey Medieval Festival Trading Cards

Get your cards before they sell out!

The trading cards which feature heroes like the Knights Templar, Sir Liam Reilly, Alexander de Vos,  Company of the Wolf, Kryal Castle, Sir Blair Martin and many more, are the first of a new range made available  via the website of the Abbey Museum of Art and Archaeology.  And if you order now, you can pick them up at the festival on July 6-7 at the Abbey Museum stall, ensuring you have your a wonderful souvenirs to match your favourite memories of the festival.  There are 40 to collect in total, and numbers are limited.  Next year it is hope the the range will be expanded.  The cards are being sold for $20 per pack of five cards.

http://www.abbeymuseum.com.au/product/heroes-of-the-abbey-medieval-festival-trading-cards/

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Woodland Walkers and Green Men

We often have people asking us what associations our beautiful woodland walkers have with Medieval history and reenactment, and you might be quite surprised at the reply. They represent a historical (fictional) figure known as the Green Man. If you have never encountered them before, our ‘Green Men’ like to walk gracefully around Abbeystowe during the festival, delighting visitors and posing for photographs, like this:

The figure of the Green Man appears to have it’s roots in carvings from the Messapotamic and Roman eras, but has also been seen in temples in India, Borneo and Nepal. He was used to bridge the gap between the old forms of worship and the new introduction of Christianity in the early Medieval period, although his appearances during this time were few.

From the late 11th century onwards his face became a carved decorative feature used on Churches and buildings of great importance. The Green Man is quite often linked the to the use of other decorative ornamentation used in the Gothic and Romanesque styles during the High Middle Ages, such as gargoyles, mythical beasts, demons, mermaids and green ‘women’. ‘Jack the Green Man’ was incorporated into village fetes and festivals which is why our woodland walkers fit right in at the Abbey Medieval Festival (why or how he was named Jack is still a bit of a mystery!)

Guess what this will be?

Visitors to the Abbey Medieval Festival 2013 and Kids Medieval Fun Day will notice a few new additions to the site. A team of handy volunteers have been working hard setting up permanent improvements at Abbeystowe. I wonder if you can guess what this one is?

VillageGreen2

Hint: It’s somewhere you can watch Gypsies dancing, listen to stories of old and be entertained by Medieval social interactions.

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Capturing The Moments

 

{Our newest guest blogger is an Abbey Medieval Festival Volunteer Photographer.  She writes about her day at the Tournament below.}

 

So why I am an Abbey Medieval Festival Volunteer Photographer?

Like most visitors to the Abbey Medieval Festival I became entranced from the moment I entered the gate.    As I was greeted with a “my lady” and a snap of my wristband I was transported to another time, another place.

Photo by David de Groot

Inside the gates so much to see, smell, taste, experience and especially to photograph!  Forget a safari or road trip,  I hardly put my camera down!  I knew I wanted more than anything to photograph inside the second rope.  This was a world of swirling Romani skirts, the clash of sword on armour, the crack of a jousting lance as it shatters, of smiling kids running and playing barefoot.  For photographers capturing each and every moment of the experience is paramount.  I jumped at the opportunity to volunteer as a photographer for 2011, and again in 2012, not just the Medieval Tournament but also other great events at the Abbey Museum.

Blending in with the Crowd

Photo by Cavanagh

We  photographers get funny looks.  Comments about our “medieval Canons” or the contrast between our costume and the hefty gear we carry around.  We try our hardest to keep from blocking others views of the activities.  Many times this means spending the day in wet and sometimes muddy clothing from sitting or laying on the ground. I call it being authentic.

Photo by Jeff Fitzpatrick

So how does a photographers day start?  For me it starts months before as I work on my “medieval camouflage”.  By blending  into the rest of the festival as much as possible I can capture the day better, and combined with my official Abbey Medieval Festival Volunteer Photographer Tunic I’m ready to go as unnoticed as possible.

Ready or Not!

Photo by M Tullet

The night before the tournament begins I set an alarm, and a backup, for early in the morning.  Inevitably, I wake early from the excitement and by four I’ve gotten up to check that I have batteries, backup batteries, flash, monopod, lenses, spare lenses, and the all important memory cards packed.  I also take the time to gather up fingerless gloves, a warm hat, the list goes on!

Before the gates open and the grass is dry, photographers can be seen setting up, getting photos of fellow volunteers, the morning sun setting the castle aglow, glinting off a sword propped against a shield, or trying to plan out how to best capture everything.

And then the day begins!

All in a Day's Work at the Abbey Medieval Festival

Photo by M Tullet

For those who have experienced a tournament you know there’s so much to see and do.  Photographers get assignments to cover, but there’s always more to fit in.  Many times we may forget to eat or stop for more than a quick drink at the fountain because something just happened to catch our eye.   From the chilly morning, to sunny bright afternoon, then back to the brisk evenings we’re there in the grass capturing each moment of the festival.  But our day is hardly over when the gates close.  After driving home we  get all our cards downloaded, backed up, and reformatted.  Batteries charged, a bite to eat and to bed to try and rest.  Meanwhile images flits through our brain, and which ones we want to try and capture the next day!  Even long after the final boom of the cannon on Sunday there is work to do, processing, editing and submitting all the photos to the Abbey Festival for use in promoting this great event.  While this doesn’t seem much to some people, we photographers tend to have thousands of photos each day and that can sometimes take us all the way up to our deadline a month after the festival.

 

Guest Blogger:  Neda Lundie

{Neda Lundie was born in the United States and now a citizen of Australia, Neda Lundie fell in love with photography at an early age.  From the moment she picked up her first 110 camera as a kid in the early 80’s, to buying her first SLR second hand in year 11, the important thing for her has been to capture life to preserve memories.

Neda has covered events at the Abbey Museum since 2011 including Abbey Medieval Festival, Kids Medieval Fun Day, Picnic at Pemberley, Kids Dig it Day and new to 2012. the Birds of Prey Experience.}

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Shields, steel and saddles: The modern sport of jousting explained

Jousting Abbey Medieval Tournament

Yes, many of the best jousters are women.  Photo: Cumberland

On 6 and 7 July Caboolture will host an international tournament for one of most interesting of modern sports – jousting.  You may think jousting was a historic chivalric pursuit, but it thrives today as a modern contact sport.
Picture this: hundreds of kilos of humans, horses and armour charging at each other, intent on landing  the point of their 3 metre lance on the body of their opponent.  There will be wood flying, dents in armour, and if the crowd gets what they want, someone will be knocked off their horse.
No wonder it is popular.  In fact, so popular there is now an International Jousting League, with rankings, and there are annual prestigious jousting events that attract the best from around the world.

 

Horses, jousting, Abbey Medieval Festival

Horses quite enjoy the jousting at the Abbey Museum.  Photo Alex Hinsch

Sounds modern?  It’s the way the sport was organised in the 13th century.  In medieval times, the best knights would travel from tournament to tournament, and were the “sports celebrities” of their day.
Like all the best sports, the rules of jousting are simple and straightforward, but they allow a great deal of subtlety and gamesmanship from the competitors.
The object of jousting is for a knight to land their lance tip on their opponent – that scores points!   A hit is called an “ataint” and an ataint scores if it is a hit on the shield, body or helmet.  But you get even more points if you shatter your lance upon your opponent.  Yes, wince as you picture that.  The lances are designed to shatter on impact, and the tips are replaced after each ataint.  The breaking point is a set distance from the tip, and a lance must break at that point if it the ataint is to count.
And what does the  jousting “stadium” look like?  Like all sports, there are tiers of seatings all around, so the spectators can see every hit, hear every grunt, and all of the action.  Some things are eternal – it was the same for the gladiatorial games in Rome.
In the middle, picture this:  two horses and riders thundering down the line  towards each other, with a flimsy barrier separating them. The barrier, called a “tilt’, was used from the 14th century to prevent collisions between jousters.
Like most equestrian sports, spectators are more worried about the horses than the humans. Fear not, the horses are safe.  Safer than the jousters.  There have always been great protections built into jousting to protect the horses.  Harming or targeting  the horses is dreadfully taboo.  If a horse is hit, the offending knight loses the tournament and traditionally had to surrender his own horse!
In fact, we think the horses rather enjoy the action and attention.  Like the jousting knights, they don’t hold back.  And that is how all elite modern sports should be .

Jousting Abbey Medieval Tournament

Grace, skill, honour … and determination. Photo by G Beard

As a modern sport, jousting  may even be better than many of the ball-chasing events you see on pay TV.
It is a brief, intense one-on-one  contest where you can’t miss the action.  All the drama is distilled down to a single moment, the moment of impact.   There is noise, there is shiny armour, there are the “oohs” and “aahs” from the crowd.  And sometimes, we see a knight knocked off his horse.
So take your kids to see an international sporting event in July. An event  with no drunken spectators, one where you get to see a result, and one where everyone learns something about the past.  Go to the jousting.

New Benches for Abbeystowe!

We have been busy making improvements to Abbeystowe (the Festival site) for this year and are proud to reveal the new bench seats that have just sprung up across the field!

There are 30 new benches in total, each one is 2.4m long and capable of seating between 4-8 people at a time. They have been dotted all round Abbeystowe, particularly in places where you, our fantastic visitors, have requested them – near the food! Benches2 Benches3 Benches4

“More seating!” has long been a cry of our visitors to the Abbey Medieval Festival and we’d like to thank our team of volunteers who put in the time to transform these lovely new seats from raw slabs of timber to backside bliss. We are now on the lookout for large sandstone or granite boulders to dot the site (let us know if you know where we can get some!).

Benches1

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Jousting Tickets – Quick and Easy Online Bookings!

TilIf you have tried to purchase tickets online for this year’s upcoming Abbey Medieval Jousting you may have noticed it was a little fiddly. Well, no more! We have just implemented a simpler, faster booking system so you can get your tickets for the joust of your choosing in a matter of clicks, right here 🙂

*** Please make sure you have purchased your festival entry tickets. Joust tickets only give access to the Joust session you have booked. Joust tickets are NOT festival entry tickets.

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Have Abbey Medieval Festival Package….will travel!

Hello readers,

Abbey Medieval Festival, travel to brisbane

Making Abbey Medieval Festival travel plans easier for Baby and Me!

It has been a while since I last posted on this page and I am currently working on the perfect excuse to contact you all again.  Today I’m going to give you a fantastic reason to visit Brisbane this winter.  Today I’m going to tell you all about the ‘Abbey Medieval Festival Travel Package’!

We had a lot of feed back last year that people found it hard to get to regional Brisbane festivals and in particular to our corner of the world for the Abbey Medieval Festival  Your travel arrangements were complicated and you found it difficult to find a place to stay……  simply put..you needed some help!  And yes we recognise while its wonderful to have a medieval festival like this with more than 37,000 visitors, the logistics involved for our visitors were challenging.

So this year, we have the perfect solution for you!

The Abbey Medieval Festival has teamed up with a number of partners to bring you ‘The Abbey Medieval Festival Package‘.  Three clicks and your travel is sorted! This package is like a pilll to take away your travel pain!  Flights, accommodation, breakfast, transfers to and from the airport and transfers to and from the festival, all sorted!

Here’s how it works!

Simply click on the link below, complete the form and our awesome ‘Travel Experience Partner’ – Uplift Tours and Travel will contact you within twenty-four hours. (Usually sooner!)

Travel to Brisbane this Winter

Uplift Tours and Travel wll take care of all your Medieval Festival travel needs!

You will see also that the landing page features our two Accommodation Partners.

We present the RendezVous Hotel and Suites and the Econolodge, both based in Brisbane CBD.  These properties are great value and have a great range of rooms and suites allocated for visitors to the Abbey Medieval Festival. Just pick your choice, and Uplift Tours and Travel will arrange the rest.

So this is a perfect solution for all those Abbey Medieval Festival visiting families and traveling groups out there to make life easier.  Give us your travelling challenges and we will make it happen for you!

We look forward to your feedback and we especially look forward to hearing about your travel experience – we know you are going to love this!

Watch out for our posts on Facebook and Twitter!

Abbey Medieval Festival Package

 

 

 

 

Medieval Banquet Tickets – nearly all gone!

The Medieval Banquets of the 2013 Abbey Medieval Festival!

Now THIS is a banquet of a distinct style!

Medieval Style of Course.  Authentic Medieval Style.  Just for you (and for us too as we enjoy it so much)

Have you got your tickets yet?

Last year we heeded your calls, and planned for two Medieval Banquets in our Abbey Medieval Festival event this year.  Thank goodness we did. We’ve already sold heaps of tickets, and there are not too many left.
I just thought I’d give you a heads-up before they all run out as they always do every year.

Medieval entertainment combines with all the elements of our Abbey Medieval Festival's Medieval Banquet to create an extraordinaryily unique experience for our guests.

Photo: David deGroot. The Medieval Banquet 2012.

It’s the attraction of the atmosphere of our Banquet that actually creates some of the disappointment some of you experience every year.  The intimacy of our gathering limits our seating numbers; this is great for everyone who manages to acquire a ticket – and not so good for those who didn’t quite get their tickets in time.

Of course, one needs clothing for a Medieval night out.  We’ve an on-going series of blog posts right now, as well as some we presented last year.  {You could use our search button on the top right-hand of our site, or follow one of the category listings beside these posts.}  There is much info to be found on our Facebook page as well for you.

And before we start with the whole reason of the Banquet  {the food 🙂 }, should you need a run-down of authentic Medieval style etiquette, then this beauty of a post is not to be missed.    The intricacies of participating in an authentic Medieval presentation of foods require Medieval arts and skills and finesse when dining.  This post will both enlighten and entertain you.

Bring on the Food!

The Menu!

Goodness me.  Just reading the menu is enough to fill me for half a day.  Vegetarians will be really pleased that they will be able to be feeling as resplendent as their fellow diners.  Two removes no less – and each a feast in itself.  And then of course, there is the Issue to balance and finish the meal.

And as always, while the banquet is underway there is entertainment galore to be had.

The Experience of a Medieval Banquet.

Without giving too much away – we work hard to make each year’s Medieval Banquet not only memorable but unique in its own way – I can show you  some highlights from last year.Serving the centre piece of Abbey Tournament Medieval Banquet 2012

There will be our famous Medieval Banquet Subtlety.  This extraordinary dish is handcrafted for the Medieval Banquet each year and the designs are getting more amazing every time.  Here is the 2012 subtlety.

Dining by candle-light, you will be entertained  in true medieval style with authentic music and a show  hosted by our own MC.

And to top it all off you have of course, our amazing volunteer contingent whose entire pleasure all night is providing for your delight!

Don’t miss out!  Here is where you get your tickets.

 

 

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Swords, Armour, and Chivalry in the Knight’s Order of Lion Rampant!

Knights Order Lion Rampant at the Abbey Tournament. Photo: Neda Lundie.

Knights Order Lion Rampant at the Abbey Tournament. Photo: Neda Lundie.

So, have you been to the Abbey Medieval Festival and have you seen some of the Medieval combats? Want to know more about the people dressed up, and what they do? The Medieval Re-enactment groups represent different groups in Medieval history. Knights Order of Lion Rampant are re-living the age of chivalry and re-creating authentic scenes from a 14th Century high medieval tournament encampment. One of their most glorified performances at the Abbey Tournament is when they bring sword combat to life on the battle field!

We spoke to Lion Rampant member, Toby, and asked him to tell us about being a knight’s valet in Knight’s Order Of Lion Rampant.

Firstly, why did you get involved with KOLR?

Mainly, I wanted to try something new! My neighbour was involved, I was interested and I love medieval history.  It was a natural fit.

How do you get you involved?

I started five years ago when the Abbey Medieval Festival was still held at the school grounds. All you need to do is show some interest in the group and make sure you sign up to QHLF.

What is QHLF?

Queensland Living History Federation. They cover you for insurance, gives you access to licences for restricted weapons, and also help you find out about other re-enactment groups.

Is insurance very important?

Swords are very dangerous! A valet practices sword progressions. You must be 16 years to participate in combat because of the danger. To minimise injury the minimum sword edge is 2mm and the point must be curved no less than the edge of a 10 cent piece

Knight gone down: Knights Order Lion Rampant, Abbey Tournament. Photo: Beard.

Knight gone down: Knights Order Lion Rampant, Abbey Tournament. Photo: Beard

What else does a knight’s valet do?

A valet helps the knight get into armour, give the Knights their swords, laugh when he falls over, help them get up when they get knocked over, give them water when they are in armour, and general help on and off the battle field.

Where do you get the armour? Do you make it?

An armour kit is too tricky to make! It requires a lot of tools. We buy it from armour makers.

Can you describe what is in an armour kit?

Firstly there is the woolen comfort garment – called the aketon – that goes underneath the armour. The knight will then put on his leg armour. The valet helps him put on the chain mail and arm armour, followed by their chest plate and the dupont over the top with the coat of arms. Lastly, the gauntlets, helmet and the sword and scabbard.

What is the most important thing to remember when putting on armour?

Ummm, To make sure the armour isn’t done too tight … or too loose. Otherwise it could restrict movement of the knight.

Any final advice for budding valets out there?

No two knights’ armour is put on the same way!

For anyone who missed out on coming to this year’s festival, here is a short YouTube video of live Medieval Sword Combat!

So, there you have it, The Knights Order of Lion Rampant are much more than fanatics in tin foil! Be sure to check out the knight next time you are at Abbey Medieval Festival.

According to the Knights Order of Lion Rampant, they have “a ‘Court of Chivalry’ for those interested in our combat training and Tournament performance, and we have a ‘Court of Love’ for those interested in the finer, gentler arts. Both are open to both young and old, male and female”.

Keep an eye out for more blog posts on our 39 different re-enactor groups at Abbey Medieval Festival. Remember, if you are using social media, be sure to like us on Facebook to be the first to know when we release a new blog!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Medieval Carnivale: Dampened show, warmed by a Fire Dragon!

Youngest member of Kamilaroi, Sasha Hinchcliff (7), makes her debut at The Medieval Carnivale. Photography: Neda Lundie.

Saturday night at the 2012 Abbey Medieval Festival was Carnivale Night.  Even though the conditions were wet, the crowd still lined up to get in the Jousting Arena to see the show. Friars Folly Tavern was busy serving mead to the costumed folk. The show began with a gypsy wedding display from Shuvani Romani Kumpani. The sounds of ululation and drumming coming from the gypsy encampment set a tribal start to the night.

The Kamilaroi horse vaulting show was scaled back to accommodate for the slippery conditions. Still, the performance had the crowd on edge as the beautifully dressed riders performed handstands and rode without hands. The giant white horses lunged around in circles and the Gypsy drumming added to the suspense as youngest member of the riding team, Sasha Hinchcliff (7), performed her vaulting debut with bravery and style.

New England Medieval Arts Society performs with a Fire Dragon. Photogrpahy: J.G. Fitzpatrick.

The lighting was powered off as New England Medieval Art Society brought out the highly anticipated Fire Dragon! The crowd in the arena was warmed by giant burning fire mosaics. Cheers were heard from the crowd as a brave warrior slayed the dragon with a fire sword.

The Fire Dragon is Slayed! Photography: Neda Lundie.

After the show, dedicated fans of the medieval show stepped into the jousting arena for the public dance workshop. Jackie Menynart from Praxis lead a dancing workshop to the largest group of medieval folk she had ever worked with. The night ran overtime as the public jigged and twirled and tore off in dancing rows for a medieval banana split.

While the weather put a chill on the show line up for many guests,  the quality of the performances still managed to make the night worthwhile to see. Promises of music, costumes, fire, horses and dancing made the Carnivale a show not to miss. It was good to see so many people brave the rainy conditions. Would anyone like to see a day time show at a future Festival? Please leave us your comments and feedback.

Dancing in the rain at The Medieval Carnivale. Photography: Neda Lundie.

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Modern Day Knights In Shining Amour

Ultimate knights in shining Armour at The Abbey Medieval Festival. Photography: Andrew Cumberland.

Hold on to your veils ladies, the Australian Jousting Team proved that modern day Chivalry is not dead!

Not only did the noble Sir Justin Holland win the Jousting competition at the 2012 Abbey Medieval Tournament,  he and fellow jouster Sir Wayne Rigg, took home the previously unrecognised title of “Ultimate Knights In Shining Armour” as they rescued a real-life damsel in distress at the Carnivale Rehearsals.

Our fair maiden had somehow twisted her foot while in the stirrup of her horse as she rode around the arena. The two Knights saw the lady was in distress and rushed to the scene to make sure she was not badly injured.

Upon finding her in pain the Knights took some ice and horse leg bandage supplies from their encampment and without further word had wrapped the damsel’s foot up.

The Knights carefully carried the young damsel into an awaiting carriage and sent her to the hospital to be checked.

News of this anonymous act of chivalry from the Australian Jousting Team have restored our faith in chivalry in modern times! Perhaps you know of other Chivalrous acts that were seen around the Abbey Medieval Festival?

 

Knights showing their respect. Photograpahy: S. Coulson.

C15th Medieval Lingerie Discovered!

 

A Fabulous Feminine Find !

{Another post from our guest blogger – Kat Woods}

When I woke yesterday morning and read a post on my facebook page from a fellow friend, I didn’t think it would be such a monumentious day. Yes, your eyes do not deceive you, you are seeing Medieval Underwear!

http://www.uibk.ac.at/alte-geschichte-orient/head/aramus.html

 

Underwear!

These garments, which I personally believe are linen due to them being in such close proximity to the skin and therefore having to be laundered frequently, have laid hidden in a vault beneath the floorboards of Lengberg Castle in East Tyrol, Austria since the 15th century.

The find, four bras (2 of which look like modern Bra’s and 2 which are described as ‘shirts with bags’) and two pairs of pants, were discovered by Beatrix Nutz, of Innsbruck University and she faced scepticism until radio-carbon dating proved otherwise.

Already since this article was first posted on the Daily Mail website in the UK yesterday, many have discussed the finds.

Two woman rightly say
“One find doesn’t mean all women everywhere during the 800years of “middle ages” wore underwear but obviously some of them, in some places at one time, did.”

“I do not believe it’s quite a shock, especially if you are a woman : wearing breasts is heavier than you think, it can hurt if you have big breasts, so why wouldn’t have a woman looked for a way to feel better in her body?”

http://www.uibk.ac.at/alte-geschichte-orient/head/aramus.htmlToday, another woman backs up my own thoughts and research with  “Until today it was just a myth:  ‘The tailoring skills to make intricately cut and shaped clothing did not really develop in Europe until the middle of the fourteenth century. About this time, women began wearing an undergarment of stiffened linen, tightened by front or back laces. In the fifteenth century this item was known as a pair of stays or bodies in English and corps or cors in French. The English word corset presumably comes from a version of the French cors. At first corsets were made of two layers of linen, held together with a stiff paste. The resulting rigid material held in and formed the wearer’s figure.’   Now we know more  :)”

From my experience into researching medieval ladies headdresses from various effigies throughout the UK the bust line is far higher than the modern bust line and the cleft of the bust is just below the collar bone. We know ladies that this is not possible; boobs cannot be that pert without some form of body binding. The Roman acrobats had leather bustiers as they are portrayed in mosaics, and we know the Italian ladies of the Renaissance also had leather laced up corsets of a similar form alongside the early Tudor corsets. Elizabeth I Funeral effigy at Westminster had reeds in her linen corset as I myself have seen it. I too have found refs’ for ‘a pair of bodies’ and ‘corsettus’ and Queen Philippa, wife to Edward III, had documented a red velvet corset, cut in 13 pieces, although there is no descriptions as to how this would look.

And I noted elsewhere yesterday “Lack of evidence doesn’t mean that evidence is lacking, we just haven’t discovered it yet.
These fabulous feminine finds to me is proof for years that backs up my hunch, there were medieval undergarments similar to Roman acrobats depicted on Mosaics. :-)”

But let’s be honest here ladies, my sisters in the Medieval Re-enactment fraternity, it maybe ‘one find’ but it is one find that gives us a closer glimpse into the woman’s side of the Medieval World, a world that is always hidden and overshadowed by the Medieval masculine world, but has always been there. Such wonderful finds like this, turn all our thinking onto its head and make us all address and re-evaluate our own research and sharing such valuable research information to each other without any bitchiness, backstabbing or malice, is what it’s is all about. I LOVE this part of our hobby. I love it when a find is found and tangible proof finally appears to back up your own private musings which you dare not say aloud for fear of being set down publicly because you dare to think outside the box by looking at other references differently, piecing them all together like a jigsaw until you have the full picture.

Until yesterday, a part of my jigsaw picture to medieval undergarments for many a year was missing from my talks of “Dressing of a Lady” ( shown here) which we did with our Group ‘Age of Chivalry’ for English Heritage. The missing piece has now fallen into place.  I cannot wait to read what the M.E.D.A.T.S  ( Medieval Dress and Textile Society)  conference discusses and many respected Medieval persons, medievalists and Historical Costumiers think when they put their thoughts to the discussion but until then I shall be happy to read the Full Article in Aug issue of BBC History and I pick up my copy today YAY!!

x

 

Guest Blogger:  Kat Woods

{~Runs a business www.kats-hats.co.uk which has raised the costume and headwear standards in re-enactment throughout the UK, Europe, Australia and USA  by producing High Quality Bespoke pieces of work for Re-enactors and Medieval Interpreters in the UK and Worldwide, English Heritage, CADW and Museums.
~Been a key participant in re-enactment for over 26yrs and in that time has portrayed Medieval, Tudor, Elizabethan and Regency with Dance and period style dresses and accessories. Is a keen researcher of period costumes and headwear but specialises in the medieval period as this is where her heart and passion is strongest. This has led to a lot of ecclesiastical research in particular photographing tomb effigies and has a large data base of primary sources.
~Ran a successful medieval dance group, called ‘The Court of King Edward’ for Excalibur Medieval Society, which had a reputation of being the best in the South West of England.
~ Now part of ‘Age of Chivalry’, a Fourteenth Century Medieval Group which specializes in the re-creation of Full Contact Tournament Fighting and Dance of the period of Edward, The Black Prince which she runs with Richard Babbage.
~Participates in dance workshops by renowned Historical Dance teachers of the Early Dance Circle, Diana Cruickshank and Philippa Waite. Attended workshops by the late Peggy Dixon.
~Organises medieval society weekend tours of Medieval Exeter with its Medieval Underground Tunnels.
~Has been made honorary member of many other UK societies due to her help and advice.
~Kat is working on a book about medieval headdresses from her research of Female Medieval Tomb effigies. She had exclusive access to the effigy of Princess Beatrice, Countess of Arundel in the Fitzalan Chapel at Arundel and had written permission from Arundel Castle to contact the Courtauld Institute of Art for more detailed photographs of the Duke of Norfolk’s ancestor.}