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EX LIBRIS

Meet the Reenactor Groups 2016

EX LIBRIS

libris

Ex Libris is a Living History group which, as it’s primary focus, presents the middle and upper class peoples from Western and Central Europe, between 1375 and 1415. They have other areas of focus as well,  which include but are not limited to: late Antiquity and the Great Migrations, through to the Renaissance. They strive to present high quality individual historical impressions with a focus on education, living history and experimental archeology. This group and its members are looking to understand the medieval period by researching and recreating the fashions, cuisine, art and lifestyles.

While they are a small group, their activities include, but are not restricted to; research, practice and demonstration of historical martial arts, equestrian skills, religious practices, music, cooking, costuming, metal, ceramic, leather, and wood work, and other skills appropriate to the subject. Ex Libris has performed at medieval fairs, like the Abbey Medieval Festival, as well as participating in small private events, lectures and demonstrations. Several of their members write blogs and contribute to other medieval pages.

Ex Libris is made up of several experienced and dedicated researchers and re-enactors, with a combined experience and knowledge of over 50+ years. What they lack in size they make up for in in enthusiasm and dedication to history.

What will you see when you come into the Ex Libris camp?

libris

A hive of activity with and smiling faces ready to answer all your questions. Ex Libris has two unofficial mottos: No. 1: “No one goes away without having their questions answered”. No. 2: “Have fun!”

When you meet Ex Libris, you not only come away with a deep sense of their passion for history, but their excitement and dedication is infectious.

This camp is a must for all guests at this years Festival!

STILL more to come on the Reenactor groups

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KARVAN-SARAY INCORPORATED

Meet the Reenactor Groups 2016

KARVAN-SARAY INC.

karvan-saray

Karvan-saray Incorporated (once known as the Kazuri Tribe) is a medieval re-enactment group who re-enact life in a caravansarai (camel inn) on the Silk Road during the late 15th Century. As traders moved along the Silk Road, they needed somewhere to stay. This meant that the caravansarai was constantly changing and influenced by a broad range of peoples from across Europe to the Far East. A caravansarai would be a place of safety for a broad number of people, who could trade, greet old friends and establish new trade and family connections. This means we represent a multicultural cross section of people and cultures. Our chosen location is a seven day camel ride west from Damascus.

As a group, Karvan-Saray research the historical arts, crafts and lifestyles of people in the Middle East in the 15th Century. Throughout the year, they run workshops for the public based around these arts and crafts. Depending upon when you enter their caravansarai, you will be enticed by fragrant cooking, and be able to participate in all activities from Henna application to drumming, from Middle Eastern Story Telling to spinning. And, of course, you will be welcomed like old friends.

karvan-saray

This group is are based in Northern Brisbane, and welcome new and enthusiastic members to join in the fun!

Immerse yourself in this groups activities this year by buying your tickets now!

More reenactor groups here soon!

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SAINT JAMES ROAD

Meet the Reenactors 2016

SAINT JAMES ROAD

saint james road

Saint James Road is a living history group of enthusiastic people who have a love of 14th Century Society (1340 –1420).
This group strive to reconstruct aspects of medieval life and culture using a hands on approach, encouraging members to make their own historically accurate props and pieces, and pass on new and old skills as they do so.

Within Saint James Road, they have vast range of different personas portrayed, from Pilgrims, Journeymen and Commoners to Merchants, Knights and Ladies. They have a strong belief of including the whole family in their group, as the children are the future of Living History.
The members of Saint James Road share a strong focus on the functioning society within this era in history and the frame work in which it operates. By referring to iconography, relics and manuscripts, they aim to reconstruct as many aspects as they possibly can, of this period. Members are encouraged to embrace the culture and history and portray a specific role in European society between the years 1340 and 1420. Through personal research, group discussions and workshops, members will be encouraged to make their period accurate equipment by themselves. This includes costuming and accessories, arms and armour, household items, furniture and tents, in order to understand this time in history and entertain both themselves and members of the public alike.

james

St. James Road group members wish to depict the diversity of this changing era of history in all areas of society as they learn and grow, while enjoying their Living History hobby.

Come and join this group at The Abbey Medieval Festival 2016 for a taste of medieval life and culture in the 14th Century!

Buy your tickets now!

Check back soon for more on other reenactor groups!

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CONDOTTIERI

Meet the Reenactor Groups 2016

CONDOTTIERI

condottieri

By the early 15th century, the coffers of the Italian city states were overflowing with gold from their trade with the east. Cities like Milan, Florence and Venice had grown in size, prestige and affluence, however their dependence on peasants to fill the ranks of their armies made them prime targets for attack by foreigners and neighbours alike.

 In order to defend their territories, the city states hired large groups of mercenaries called “Condotta”, which were lead by captains called Condottieri.

 Unlike the Knights of other European countries, Condottieri were not necessarily nobles. Many were low born and more than a few were foreigners. Anyone with the skills and determination could become Condottieri; for this they were rewarded with wealth, land, recognition and fame.

However, some were little more than bandits and thieves and it was not uncommon for them to change sides, for the right price, and many of them receiving bribes from towns to avoid being attacked.

The Condottieri attracted all those in society who aspired for greatness; some were adventurers, great captains, statesmen, patrons of the arts, patriots and others, like Hawkwood, Sforza, Malatesta, Federico Da Montefeltro and the Medici’s, were powerful political figures who left their mark on history.

Condottieri

The Condottieri living history group is a group dedicated to recreating the look and feel of an Italian mercenary encampment in the late 15th century. Various aspects of the lives of the nobility, knights, soldiers, craftsmen and camp followers are brought to life for the entertainment and enjoyment of all. This includes the clothes they wore, the foods they ate, the games and entertainment they enjoyed, their arts and crafts and their military and martial skills. All this and much more will be on display at the Abbey Medieval Festival this year.

 

To see these amazing displays by the Condottieri group this year, buy your tickets now!

Check back here for more on other Reenactor groups.

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COMPANY OF THE DOVE

Meet the Reenactor Groups 2016

 

COMPANY OF THE DOVE

 

dove

 

Company of the Dove was a free company, a late medieval army of mercenaries acting independently of any government, and thus “free”. They regularly made a living by plunder when they were not employed. They were based in Brittany, France, at the start of the Hundred Years War, a series of conflicts waging from 1337 to 1453 between the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of France, and their various allies, for control of the French throne.

Starting out initially as a traditional archery group, Company of the Dove are mostly English archers, with some men at arms, and their families, and encourage all interests in the medieval way of life. They have been a loyal visit to the Abbey Medieval Festival for many years, and continue to draw public interest not only in the period of time, but in their individual group’s activities and encampment.

Company of the Dove

Company of the Dove is a family based medieval re-enactment group who adhere to Qld Living History Federation standards, and are involved with weapons training, traditional archery, clothing, furniture, music, encampments, medieval cooking and feasts, as well as studying and re-enacting all facets of medieval life in the mid 14th century (1348-1361).

They run workshops to help their members get more involved in medieval tasks and equipment and they make a lot of our own equipment.

 

To meet Company of the Dove this year, buy your tickets now!

Get to know some of the other Reenactors groups here.

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KNIGHTS OF THE EMPIRE GERMANICA

Meet the Reenactors 2016

 

KNIGHTS OF THE EMPIRE GERMANICA

germanica

Knights of the Empire Germanica is a Medieval German re-enactment group in the High Middle Ages period.
They are a Brisbane based re-enactment group depicting the Germanic nobility of the Holy Roman Empire. They practice armoured combat and try to recreate the colour, traditions and day-to-day life of the nobility and their retainers.

A family orientated group, their aim is to create an environment that enables learning about medieval life. Medieval re-enactment is a way of bringing history to life in an exciting and hands-on way. The members of Knights of the Empire Germanica get to actively create and use their equipment, and find out how it all works in a real-life setting. It is especially rewarding to members to be able to engage in a hobby which can include the whole family.

Knights of the Empire Germanica is a group with many years of activity in Brisbane. ‘KEG’ has close ties with other re-enactment groups with whom they share combat training, public appearances such as attending the Abbey Medieval Festival, and other demonstrations. As a group they share research, cook and share medieval food at feasts, create medieval clothing, armour and equipment, and train warriors to be formidable but entertaining fighters.

Knights of the Empire Germanica are a friendly group and are always happy to interact with the public for discussion or photo opportunities. Come and see them at the Medieval Festival this year!

Knights of the Empire Germanica encampment activities

 

To meet Knights of the Empire Germanica, buy your tickets now!

Read more on other Reenactor groups here.

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COMPANIE OF KNIGHTS BACHELOR

Meet the Reenactor Groups 2016

 

COMPANIE OF KNIGHTS BACHELOR

Companie

Companie of Knights Bachelor is one of Brisbane’s oldest re-enactment groups. Established in 1989, this group re-enacts the splendor of the 12th century and early 13th century, and the heroism of the Crusades. Companie members travel across Queensland as well as interstate to attend events such as the Abbey Medieval Festival, and other living history events, to live out life as a member of the 12th century nobility, either fighting in melees and tournaments, or showing off other medieval skills to the public.

The Companie also runs private Medieval Feasts and Living History weekends, to recreate the society and culture of the 12th and early 13th century with artisan craft displays and heroic swordplay.

At the Abbey Medieval Festival each year, Companie of Knights Bachelor reenact the pageantry and excitement of a medieval tournament. Knights join battle in a test of martial strength. Ladies cheer encouragement for their favorite Knight and partake of the gentler art of courtly love. After the Tournaments, the knights and ladies retire to their authentic encampment at Abbeystowe for some feasting, gaming, singing and dancing.

Companie of Knights Bachelor

Members of the Companie take keen interest in medieval arts and crafts, and study the historical background surrounding the Crusades. They employ a high standard of historical accuracy, encouraging every member to do much historical research. All the gear they use at shows and displays has to be documented, to encourage the highest degree of realism that twentieth-century society can produce. Companie of Knights Bachelor and its members are looking forward to returning to the Abbey Medieval Festival this year and educating and entertaining the public one again!

To come and meet the Companie of Knights Bachelor, buy your tickets now!

Check back here for more on Meet The Reenactors 2016

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KNIGHTS OF THE LONGDOG

Meet the Reenactor Groups 2016

 

KNIGHTS OF THE LONGDOG

knights of the longdog

 

The Knights of the Longdog 
are on a noble quest to educate people about the important role greyhounds (sight hounds) played in medieval times, and about what wonderful pets they make. The group represents a new generation of champions – we don’t wear chain mail, joust, or win sword fights…but we are brave, fearless and loyal, much like our hounds. We show the public and other re-enactors the lives sight hounds would have had, and portray the individuals who would have owned or cared for them during the 12th – 14th centuries in England.

In modern times/the real world, we are a mix of dog lovers who enjoy history and their hounds. We have greyhounds (generally rescued racing dogs), Borzoi (Russian Wolfhounds), and Irish Wolfhounds – all whom would have been called “greyhounds” in the medieval period. We also have an Alaunt who has just joined the group, and brings with her a number of trained rats who help us teach people about the role rats played in the medieval period!

We do a lot of training with our dogs and their owners to ensure the dogs are very comfortable with huge crowds and people of all ages. We do performances at the Abbey Medieval Festival that showcase their skills, and also give people an opportunity to feed the hounds! We give people lots of information on how they lived (they had awesome kennels), what they wore (harnesses, decadent collars, capes), how they were trained (which was mainly food based, just like it is today), who looked after them…you name it, you can learn about it so make sure you visit us this year at the Abbey Medieval Festival!

Knights of the Long Dog

To meet Knights of the Longdog and their amazing hounds, buy your tickets now!

For more on the Reenactors, check back here

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Blackwolf

Meet the Re-enactor Groups 2016

BLACKWOLF

 

It was a feature of medieval warfare that armies tended to live off the invaded land, foraging wherever they could. In Outremer, the Middle East as we know it today, crops were grown and gathered around the water sources. Controlling the water sources and supply routes meant that you controlled the land.

Invading forces attempted to set up supply lines but often in Crusader times, supplies from overseas failed to arrive and often was too little, too late. Supplies had to be easily transported, not spoil and all fresh meat herded “on the hoof”. To alleviate this, Blackwolf – a 12th-13th century Crusader group – traversed the caravan routes, posing as Bedouin Traders, trading where they could, often preying on opposition caravans for vital supplies.

blackwolf reenactor

Blackwolf were a mixture of European nationalities, local Armenian, Christian Arab, and mercenaries from the plains of the Danube, the Magyars and Kipchak. Any who would join Blackwolf to further Christian interests. This mix of nationalities demonstrated differing garb and customs, and, they use this to reflect a variety of cultures and traditions for the public interest. Some Blackwolf members are combatants, whose principal function is the crash and bash of medieval combat. They are also finding ways to enhance their camp each year expanding crafts and skills such as medieval medicine, Bedouin coffee ceremony, Bedouin cooking and cheese-making. Also adding bone carving and linen production from growing flax. The Bedouin tended to rob wild bee colonies where honey was used as a “currency” and the wax was used to make candles.

Black Wolf

Blackwolf have chosen to portray these Middle Eastern and Eastern cultures in their encampment because this was a little known and unexplored aspect of medieval life. The 12th-13th centuries is a fascinating time of social upheaval, progress and changes in thinking, trade goods and textiles. If nothing else, exposure to eastern trade, medicine and foodstuffs, even the game of chess, did much to renovate Western Europe. There is a great interest in medieval life, what they ate, what they wore and what were their customs so Blackwolf seek to present this to the public in an authentic and enjoyable manner.

 

Check back for more on “Meet the Reenactors 2016”

Buy your tickets now to meet these groups in person!

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Medieval Airport!

Abbey Medieval Festival at Brisbane Airport

 The Abbey Medieval Festival has an awesome surprise for you if you are travelling interstate or internationally during the upcoming school holidays! As part of our strategy to expand markets, both within Australia and overseas, from the 1st of June to the first week of July, tickets to the Abbey Medieval Festival will be available for sale at the international terminal of Brisbane Airport!

Abbey Medieval Festival Jousting

No motorbikes, no 4×4, but there is medieval battling and jousting!

Look for our huge banner and posters that feature the Hero image of the Abbey Medieval Festival! Airport staff and ambassadors for the Abbey Museum will also be sporting Abbey Medieval Festival t-shirts and are happy to pass on information about the Festival!

So stop for a moment, buy a ticket, bring your friends and family and travel back to a time gone but not forgotton.  Press a mental pause on the trains, planes and automobiles and transform yourself physically and mentally to a life that your ancesters might have experienced.  The Abbey Medieval Festival is held on the 6th and 7th of July and the festival is your ticket to time travel.  This celebration is the biggest and most authentic medieval showcase in the southern hemisphere and we are so fortunate to have it on our doorstep in Queensland!  Normally, you might have to travel to Europe to see a spectacular as good as this one and this year is no exception! It’s getting bigger and better than ever before! And having tickets at the airport makes it one step easier for you.

Fill your weekend with enthrallig displays from musicians, dancers and street performers from across Australia and overseas, experience battle re-enactment, jousting, archery, Turkish oil-wrestling, gypsy dance, arts and crafts, authentic medieval delicacies and so much more! There is so much to see and do! You will wish the festival ran for months!!

Abbey Medieval Festival

It’s time to go home!

For more information please call the Abbey Museum of Art and Archaeology on 5495 1652, or visit our webpage at www.abbeytournament.com.

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Winter is Coming – and how medieval people dealt with it!

Here in sunny Queensland one could argue that it never gets very cold during winter, so what did those who were in seriously cold winters wear to stay warm and survive?

Some might argue that they simply didn’t keep warm! Houses weren’t warm as they are now, as heating wasn’t very effective, and tended to smoke up the house. People tended to wear lots of clothing, as the cold inside could be the same level of cold as outside.

For the lower classes, the outer layer tended to be made of wool, with the under layers made of linen. These linen garments were washed occasionally, but it was unusual to wash the woollen layers. The smoke that was almost a constant feature from the fires seemed to permeate the outer layers and act as a sort of deodorant, to help stop everyone becoming too smelly.

Cloaks, mittens and woollen hats were also worn to keep warm, but shoes were often a luxury! Imagine not being able to afford shoes in snowy weather!

The wealthy were able to line their clothing with fur to keep warm, a luxury the poor could never afford. The use of fur was covered by Sumptuary laws, which governed who could and could not wear particular fabrics, veils, and other things like that. Even who could eat what!

Farm families typically lived in a cottage which had one big single room, in the middle of which would be a hearth for the fire. Above the hearth was a hole in the rood for the smoke, and ‘hanging chimneys’ may have been used to help guide the smoke. The windows in the cottage were usually also unglazed, which led to houses and cottages being rather draughty and chilly.

Wealthy families were better off though, as they had less draughty building and more furnishings to trap in heat. The personal attendants of the lord and lady were sometimes able to stay in their sleeping quarters, wrapped up in a blanket on the floor where they could absorb some of the heat from the fireplace. The lord and lady, and their families, also had heavy blankets, feather mattresses, fur covers and wall tapestries to help block out breezes and the cold, and those with four poster beds were able to use the heavy curtains to trap in heat to keep even warmer.

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Just one of the many re-enactors.

One of the perks of coming to the Festival is seeing all the amazing costumes that the reenactors create! We have more than 25 groups who come and make the weekend so special, from the dramatic jousting to the delicate foods of times long gone.

The costuming is arguably one the of best parts of the festival, and it really shows how fashions change, and how innovations of the time help to shape fashions, along with status, wealth, and location.

I’m going to talk about the SCA in this post, as they have such a broad scope it’s great for a non-re-enactor like me to understand what they’re doing!

The SCA (Society for Creative Anachronism) is one of our re-enactment groups coming to the Festival this year, and it’s an international non-profit educational organisation that is dedicated to the research and recreation of pre-17th century European History, with a particular focus on its practical applications in arts and sciences, including costuming, cooking, martial arts, dance, calligraphy and illumination, metalwork, archery and music. They have a broad scope in interests, which means that they can cater to anyone.

They have a huge network of re-enactors, and great resources which are accessible to anyone looking to find more information on their favoured period.

http://sca.org/officers/chatelain/photos/Court2-mil.jpg

http://www.sca.org/officers/media/images/clash_lg.jpg

All the groups at the Festival help create the amazing atmosphere and we really couldn’t do it without them!

I’ve developed a love of the late-14th century, and have started delving into every resource I can to find out everything I can.

For more information on our fabulous re-enactor groups, check out https://abbeymedievalfestival.com/get-involved/visitors/ to find out who is doing your favourite period in history! What and who are you looking forward to seeing?

 

Christmas in the Middle Ages 1 of 3

 

{We are pleased to present you with another guest blog by Sir Justyn – ‘Christmas in the Middle Ages’ Part 1 of 3 for your Christmas break reading}

Celebrating a Middle Ages, Medieval Christmas

Often when we think of Christmas, we think of it as a time for holiday, family and friends, a well deserved break from the year’s labours. Some people view it as an exercise in capitalism and retail selling, others as a strictly religious affair but often what we don’t realise is that Christmas existed long before the modern era.
Many people credit the Victorian era, which is 1837AD to 1901AD, as the source of most of our Christmas traditions originated; what these folks miss is that the Victorian era saw the revitalization and an interest of the Medieval  period and it’s customs and traditions.
In the Middle Ages you might be surprised to learn that at Christmas people gave each other gifts, decorated their homes, went carolling, feasted on seasonal foods and drink and celebrated the Feast of Saint Nicholas the Wonder Maker, albeit on December 6th not on the 25th.

St Nicholas (St Nikola) the Wonder Maker . Photo from Wikipedia.
In fact the whole of December was a month of celebration. Recently I wrote on my Facebook page  “In the Middle Ages, December marked a time where most of the years hard agricultural work had been done and many folks could start to relax in anticipation of the celebration of Christmas. All planting had been done and animals were housed for the onset of winter. There were 12 official days of holidays and feasting spread throughout December and as a result most people had the opportunity to simply sit back and relax for the entire month! How times have changed.”

Middle Age Christmas Festivities Abounded

What did they do during this time of holiday and festivities?

  • Singing and dancing was popular.

Much like parts of continental Europe and the Middle East today, in the Middle Ages, whole communities would come together and take part in singing and dancing as a community. Imagine if you will, a hundred small villages and towns having an old fashioned country medieval barn dance and you are fairly close to how it might have been.
Music of course would accompany these activities and were mostly performed by local minstrels – often merely an average person who had a knack for playing music just as it was in many Australian communities 50 to 100 years ago. These activities involving music and dance were a staple part of any festive occasion on the medieval calendar and certainly more so during the winter month of December

  • Carols and hymns were a frequent occurrence during this time.

Carols were more of a secular type of song, whereas hymns were religious in nature. The distinction has not really changed when compared to today, except that today many songs that we call carols were actually hymns in the Middle Ages.
Carols were often ribald and light-hearted songs with a seasonal relevance whereas hymns were more austere and sung the year round.  Another distinction with carols were that even though they had spiritual or religious themes and connotations,  they were less complicated to learn and sing, They were aimed for the common folk, and usually written by laymen and not the clergy.

  • Theatre was also a popular December form of entertainment.

Plays and pageants, mumming and allegorical or festive tournaments were all forms of theatre abounding in Medieval Christmas times.
Plays often had strong moral points to them and were originally performed by monks. While they were frequently used as a way to teach common folk Biblical tales,  just as often they acted out the life and tales of a saint.

At other times  they were plays which told of ribald, slapstick characters and lewd stories causing them to be banned from church grounds and the clergy forbidden to take part in them. As unacceptable as they were to the church, even these had strong moral points to impart.

  • Pageants were something a little grander.

There was no stage present but rather wagons constructed with two levels and moved to a given place in town or city with adequate performance space. This was the forerunner of the mardi  gras as it is seen today.
In medieval York and Chester these parades with a convoy of wagons each performing a short play would travel through the streets from dawn until dusk each Christmas. Imagine if you will a train of stages coming to your place of work or home, performing plays and moving on, one after the other all day long. It could almost be seen a s a medieval form of television! Back in the Middle Ages however, acting was considered one of the lowest forms of employment or profession again something that is starkly contrasted in our own day and age.

  • Mumming was a form of medieval street theatre.

Mummers in the middle ages.  Photo from 'From Old Books' .org

This included plays, costumes, music and dance. Groups of mummers would frolic from neighbourhood to neighbourhood in a form of both structured and improvised theatre performances. It was very important that the mummers were incognito. They would apply makeup, masks, cloaks and hoods in very much what was not just a forerunner again of mardi gras but perhaps more recognizably as Carnivale or a Masque Ball.
These requirements of disguise were a superstition that went back to pagan times, as did many other parts of Christmas tradition, in that the mummers were summoning or performing to entice the sun back and shorten the winter.

It was claimed that if a mummer’s identity was revealed the magic would fail and the winter would be long and harsh. In the Middle Ages it was not as much a superstition as a courtesy. It was bad manners to publicly point out the identity of a mummer – not for reasons of pagan superstition but for the sake of maintaining the mystery of the performance and its performers.

 

Guest Blogger:  Sir Justyn
{Justin Webb a.k.a. Sir Justyn is a professional medieval performer, educator, medieval combat instructor and author, internationally renowned for public speaking and displays. He has performed, taught and spoken not only in Australia but also in England and France. He is also the leading member of Eslite d’ Corps, a high quality 14thC Living History group. You can learn more about Sir Justyn at www.sirjustyn.com and on his Facebook page.}

In part 2 of 3 of Sir Justyn’s Medieval Christmas blog articles we will look at Magic, Christmas horticultural traditions and seasonal saints.

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Medieval Surgery – An Insight

 

Medieval Surgery is a featured Workshop at the Abbey Medieval Festival.  For your pleasure and interest we are featuring our latest guest blogger!

Medieval Doctor’s Journal
by Magister Mathieu medicus

Eve of feast day of St Lazarus

 

Yes! I made it through to the finals! Photo by Sheldrick

It’s been a trying day for me with only a few weeks to go before the great tournament, and so many new visitors to the city. The young knights have been showing off with the excitement, as expected, with a few unfortunate injuries occurring.

 

 

Clubbing - Medieval Style. Photo by N Lundie

One unlucky French squire was struck hard upon his head but fortunately I was able to diagnose, as described by Avicenna, that he had no hidden fractures and so was not required to make incision into his head. Instead I treated him with a poultice of absinthe, vinegar, artemisia, wild celery, onions, rue and cumin, which are mixed in lard and flour and applied to the affected part. He should recover well, God willing.

I visited Sir Barnard again this morning, to see how his leg was healing. He was kicked by a horse in his leg, over 4 months ago, which became infected and was weeping from many places. Every time one would close, another would open in a different place. I was called to see him and ordered his servants remove all the previous ointments and only wash his leg with very strong vinegar every day. By this, all the cuts are now healed, and he has recovered enough that he shall be riding with the King again within a week, much to the annoyance of many local emirs!

 

I'm OK, really! Photo by Ivey

My last visit was for a local Frankish sergeant who had been shot in the neck whilst defending a trading caravan from bandits. I removed the arrow head at once and found a vein had been cut. I then proceed to close the injured vessel with sutures above and below the site and then inserted a cloth strip moistened with eggwhite into the wound. I instructed his friends to change the plaster every day until the purulent drainage ceases, and to only let him eat thin clear broth until then.

I need to check on the apothecary again this evening, as I have need of many items that are brought in by traders from abroad, and he has promised me that he has new shipments of frankincense and even some herbs that do not grow well nearby.
My day will finish with overseeing my assistants in making various powders I will need for treating the wounds which will surely come when the tournament begins!

 

Guest Blogger:  Michelle Barton

{Michelle Barton, a Brisbane local, has been re-enacting medieval life since 1993, ranging from steel combat in 12th mail armour to learning the frustrating art of card weaving. She is also a veterinarian of over 15 years experience, so an interest in medieval medicine and surgery, and trying to find the truth from the myth, was always guaranteed. Her medieval medical texts are starting to rival the numbers of veterinary texts in her house! Presenting this information to others in a fun and engaging manner is an added bonus. }