A Crusader’s Journey

Take ‘A CRUSADER’S JOURNEY’ with us, as we come together in support of those affected by the ongoing bushfires! Please help us sell all tickets so we can DONATE ALL WE CAN!

 Tickets Available now on Eventbrite! Click here!

This will be a night to remember as you become immersed in your journey along the Crusaders route delighting your taste buds with flavours from exotic lands.

Let your eyes feast on colourful characters from times long past as you step back in time.

This delightful evening is our crusade to raise funds to support those affected by the devastating bush fires and 100% of the profits will be donated.

Visti The Viking

Visti “the Viking” Skaanvad, who has been involved in Viking re-enactment for over 20 years, departed for Valhalla and the higher battlegrounds on 19th of February 2014.

Visti was well-known for his amber and Viking jewellery trading, and for his unique mead making. He started the Viking re-enactment group Saga Vikings in 1995 and in 2012, he donated his Viking ship “Fafnir,” which he had built by hand using traditional Viking tools and methods, to Abbeystowe for all to see during the festival.

Visti truly believed he was a reincarnated Viking from 1000 years ago.  He grew up and played on Lindholm Høje as a child, before the area was excavated in 1952, which later revealed the huge Viking burial site that can be seen today.

In true Viking style and because it was his deepest wish, Visti was cremated with a wooden Viking ship wearing his full Viking outfit of tunic, trousers, jewellery, Viking leather shoes and fur cloak.  In the graveyard of his hometown in Denmark, a runestone stands in his honour, complete with a bronze Viking longship on top.  Visti the Viking will be dearly missed.

“Cattle die, kindred die, every man is mortal: But the good name never dies of one who has done well.”

Photos courtesy of Visti’s daughter, Penny.

Carlo, Penny, Visti and his grandson

Fafnir in it’s prime

Penny and Carlo with the story of Visti’s creation.

Sailing near Woody Point.

Ready to go in the backyard.

Visti’s family.

Fafnir ready for battle.

Fafnir detail.

The Viking and his creation.

Stallholders at the Abbey Medieval Festival

Hark! Medieval stallholders, traders and vendors – we want you!

Merchants and stallholders selling or demonstrating wares at the medieval market-place is one of the most popular attributes of the Abbey Medieval Festival and a much loved favourite of fans and visitors!

Medieval Stallholders

The aim of the festival is to provide an authentic medieval environment, including the market place and each year carefully selected stallholders take part.  Stalls include items such as medieval food, arts, crafts and weapons such as medieval swords or shields. The period re-created at the Abbey Medieval Festival covers a thousand years – from AD 600 to 1600 – allowing a great variety of re-enactment arts and crafts.  

What medieval goods do you have?

High standards are set for our merchants, crafts persons or artisans, with the bench-mark being raised year-on-year, in order to consistently improve on our reputation as Australia’s most authentic medieval event.  With almost 30,000 visitors annually, we welcome new merchants and crafts persons to our market. Participation is on a first-come, first-accepted process, providing the criteria is met.  Applications are now open for the 2019 festival, and if you would like send us an application, please read the Medieval Stallholder Requirements to check the necessary details. Wearing a costume appropriate to your time period is a requirement and a general reference to the particular era your goods relate to should also be made in your application.

Demonstrators’ stalls

Demonstrators of crafts should use materials of the period; for instance, card-weaving displays should have cards of appropriate materials, such as leather, bone or wood. Modern playing cards used in tablet weaving displays are not in keeping with our medieval theme and are not acceptable.  We accept that some crafts may need to use some modern tools and materials however, these should be kept to a minimum and if possible out of sight of the public. Blatantly modern items are not in keeping with our medieval theme and should be hidden or eliminated.   And each year we ask traders to work a little harder to become an authentic participant!

Here are some examples of our stallholders  or demonstrator skills that we are sourcing:

  • Calligraphy
  • Illumination
  • Book binding
  • Leatherwork
  • Jewellery
  • Metalwork and black-smithing
  • Armour and weapons
  • Enamel work
  • Carving in wood, bone, antler and ivory
  • Mosaic
  • pottery
  • Glasswork
  • Stained glass
  • Painting in fresco, tempera and oils
  • Stonework
  • Embroidery and other textile arts
  • Spinning, weaving and dying
  • Tablet weaving
  • Braid making
  • Cooking

 

We especially welcome purveyors of crafts that are specifically medieval, such as pilgrim badge makers, potters making authentic medieval pottery, costumers in the style of the period, armourers, and so on.

Submit an application form!

So, if you are a merchant or craft-person selling or demonstrating wares that were part of the artistic heritage of the Middle Ages, we want you! Remember to check out the details firs, and if you are still interested, submit your application for 2019.

The do’s and don’ts of feasting (Part I)

Today on Medieval Eye for the Modern Guy we look at the do’s and don’ts of feasting.

A few rules of thumb as you prepare yourself for the upcoming Abbey Medieval banquet.

What to Wear

We shall of course not even suggest to lecture the Ladies on what to wear as their fashion sense should always be beyond reproach. Gentleman however may require some discrete coaching on what is expected at a banquet and what are definite medieval faux pas!

Obviously a gentleman would never dream of sitting down to dine in polite company in armour. The same goes for carrying weapons such as axes crossbows etc. After all you are going out for an intimate dinner for 300; not a family reunion. Daggers are an exception as they are simply too dainty to be considered a weapon and the jewelled hilt just cries out to be accessorised. The only weapon you will require is your rapier sharp wit (having a few trusty armed retainers ready outside with a fast getaway horse can be handy if your rapier wit gets you into trouble)

A few hints for the truly fashion conscious; rusty armour is out; shiny silks, fine furs and brocades and damasks are in. Don’t be afraid to mix your colours or go with a simple parti-colour for a striking effect by dressing with one side white or gold and the other red or blue.  Bareheaded is so common so hats are also in this season but if you really want to stand out try a circlet of silver or gold to accent your luxurious locks, and it keeps them out of your food. Furs are always in but they should be artfully tailored and not look like you are still sharing them with the animal. Also don’t be disappointed that no one believes a great hunter when you have a sheepskin draped over your shoulders.

The best maxim is coats bright, hose tight, furs exotic, hats amazing, codpiece outlandish, manners polished and smile dashing and you can’t help but be a hit with the ladies and a threat to your peers.

Image source: Pinterest

Tools of the Trade

It goes without saying that to dine properly you will of course require servants, but if you are travelling light you should still have the following:

  • Spoon ( silver or gold preferred)
  • Knife (small and sharp)
  • Napkin (white linen, silk is so overdone)
  • Bowls ( clean, precious metals or decorated ceramic are acceptable)
  • Cup or goblet ( silver or gold always acceptable though venetian glass is trending right now)
  • Finger bowl with warm scented water (for hand washing not plunge bathing)

These items can be used individually, sequentially, in combinations but NEVER all at once.

(Please note: This is information pertaining to dining in the Middle Ages: no “tools” are required for our banquets)

Instructions for use

Spoons are for eating pottages, soups and deserts which are placed in your bowl, never in your hand or neighbour’s hat. The knife (definitely not your dagger) is used for cutting your food into dainty morsels (gobbets) which you then pop into your mouth with your fingers. Whilst some foods can be taken on the point of a knife (not soups) it shows a definite lack of breeding to do so and gobbets of food should be eaten with the fingers (your own).  Don’t hack at your food with your knife like you are running late for the Crusades and don’t want to miss out on all of the fun and taking an axe to the roast, or your neighbours, is definitely a big no.  A two pronged fork is acceptable for pasta and shellfish but don’t flash it round like some nouveau rich burgher out to impress his boorish urban friends. Some also think it is stylish to use a spike to place food in the mouth; but ask yourself if a fork is doubtful how can eating with half of a fork be acceptable?  Your napkin is to be used for wiping your mouth, fingers and utensils. Keep it classy and simple and remember that eating with your fingers never goes out of style.

The Abbey Medieval banquets take place on the 30th June and 7th July and there will be no better place to put your medieval manners into practice.  Get your tickets here.

By Damien Fegan