Abbey Medieval Festival Sponsor MBRIT examines Medieval Tourism

MBRIT Tourism

 

 

 

 

JOUSTING TOURNAMENTS WERE A FORM OF TOURISM IN MEDIEVAL TIMES 

Noblemen and noblewomen, the most exciting season of the year has almost arrived – tournament season that is! Spectators from lands near and far will be travelling from their castles and villages to Moreton Bay Region this July to relive history and witness one of the greatest sporting tournaments to ever exist – the Abbey Medieval Festival jousting tournament! Jousting tournaments were the most prestigious events on the medieval social calendar throughout the Middle Ages and medieval people would often flock to every tournament to watch the knights battle and show off their combat skills to the crowd. Moreton Bay Region Industry & Tourism is a proud sponsor of the Abbey Medieval Festival, and is very excited about the tourism that events like Abbey provide to the region. The jousting sessions are one of the draw cards for Abbey Medieval Festival and are events you definitely do not want to miss! Jousting sessions are ticketed events that will draw many other nobles to the Abbey Medieval Festival on July 8 and 9. Make sure you and your friends secure a spot in the Jousting Tournament grandstand so you can cheer on your favourite knight in shining armour and tell them to ‘break a lance’!

 

 Jousting as a tourism experienceJousting and the significance of jousting tournaments

 

Jousting was a medieval sport that involved knights charging at each other on horseback. Participating in the tournaments was often their way of earning respect and admiration from the crowd. Crowds would travel from great distances to the tournaments to watch the knights for entertainment purposes – as winning or losing a jousting tournament would often affect a knight’s social status and be a popular topic of conversation after the tournament. Tournaments were a great way for boosting tourism through medieval towns and villages as many people would travel far distances to witness these spectacles.

 Who attended jousting tournaments?

Jousting tournaments in the medieval era were attended by many people of varying social status. Considered to be one of the most important events to attend, many people of royalty would travel to jousting tournaments. Their appearance at such an event was a sign of support to knights, some of whom they may have entered into the tournament to represent their families. Merchants and families predominantly from the noble class would also travel to jousting tournaments to watch the thrilling action unfold. Because of the number of people in attendance, these events helped to support local merchants sell their wares and the greater local economy.

Even more jousting from the Abbey Medieval Festival

So because jousting tournaments were a well loved feature in medieval times, Queensland is proud to bring even more  jousting to you in 2017!  New on the program for this year’s Abbey Medieval Festival,  is the additional Friday afternoon joust tourney.  So you not only have a chance to see jousting on the Saturday and Sunday, but now on Friday 7th July,  gates open at 1.30pm  for as special behind the scenes view of a pre-constructed  Abbey Medieval Festival.  With limited seating, this event will offer patrons – in the spirit of a truly personal tourism experience –  a unique chance to get up close and personal with medieval  jousters.  The rest of the grounds will be off-limits, so prepare a list of questions that you’ve always wanted to ask a Jouster and make this tourism experience your opportunity to interact with a Medieval Knight.  Huzzah!  Get tickets here!

Jouster Blog Series – Lady Elizabeth Brown

Liz Brown JoustJousters competing at the 2017 Abbey Medieval Festival 

Welcome again to our Jouster blog series.  Every week,we feature the wonderful Jousters competing at this year’s festival.  This is a great opportunity for you to get to know our participants,  a little about their background, skill and abilities.  Keep posted!

 

Name:  Lady Elizabeth Brown

 

Heraldry:  Lady Elizabeth’s colours are magenta and blue and her shield bears the Cross of St Columb, Cornwall, England

Did you know:  Lady Elizabeth has been involved with the Abbey Medieval Tournament for over 10 years, supplying and training  the amazing horses that we see each year.    She is more well known for being the Head Marshall.   Lady Elizabeth first took to the field in 2009 and then returned in 2016, when she was the highest hitting female jouster.  She is the owner of Moonlight Manor Horse Riding.

And there’s more:  Lady Elizabeth is also a horse riding instructor, riding in Equestrian disciplines, teaching in Greenbank, South Brisbane.   The Lady Elizabeth hails from England, Canada and Australia and could in fact, represent all three countries.

 

To see the Lady Elizabeth and our other fantastic jousters, don’t forget to book you tickets here.

 

 

 

 

Jouster Blog Series – Ecuyer Le Marquis

Jouster Ecuyer Le Marquis

Jousters competing at the 2017 Abbey Medieval Festival

 

Welcome once again to our Jouster Blog series.   Each week we feature a jouster, some you will be familiar with, some not so.   This week we are very proud to feature our international jouster.    This is a great opportunity for you to get to know our participants,  a little about their background, skill and abilities and jouster spirit!  Keep posted!

 

 

Name:  Ecuyer Le Marquis ( Michael Sadde)

 

Motto:  ‘pro rege saepe, pro patria semper’ – ‘For king often, for country always.

 

Heraldry:Jouster Michael Sadde

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Did you know:  Sir Michael, one of our international Jousters at the Abbey Medieval Festival in 2017, was born in France, began competing in jousting competitions in 2009 and has participated in international tournaments around the world, including Belgium, France, Poland, Italia, England, Australia, United States, Canada, Russia, and Denmark.  His first time to Australia, this  former rider of the Republican Guard at Paris, and is now a professional jouster.  He is the organizer of the Tournament of the Order of Saint Michel in solid lances and President of the ‘écuyers de l’histoire’  leading a team of 25 members.

 

Don’t miss the opportunity to meet Sir Michael and our other jousters at the Friday afternoon joust.  Book your tickets here!

 

 

Jouster Blog Series – Sir Luke Binks

Luke Binks

 

 

Name: Sir Luke Binks

Born – 01/07/1981
Motto: Deeds not words – Factis non verbis

Heraldry: Yellow and BlackJouster Heraldry Luke Binks

Did you know: Luke has been a Jouster since 2001.  He is a professional reproduction armourer and the owner of Red Hart Reproductions.

Horse:  Luke will be riding Mayville Lodge Sincero, a twelve year old Andalusian Stallion and 2017  Abbey Medieval Festival will be this horse’s first tournament.

 

Did you know: Luke was born in Warwick, Queensland and developed a love for all things medieval from a very early age and was particularly inspire by Ivan Hoe, Excalibur and Robin Hood movies. From the age of eight, he was either playing with Knight Lego, making wooden swords, jousting from his bicycle or hunting rabbits with his bow.  At 14 Luke joined a re-enactment group and learned to fight in real armour with real weapons, further furling the flames.  At 21, Luke bought his first horse and learned to ride and fight from horse-back.  It was around this time that Luke started his business as a professional armourer.

And there’s more: 16 years later, Luke has not stopped.  He has traveled the world jousting and has been a pioneer for the Australian and global jousting community. He has jousted in Australia, New zealand, Belgium, Holland, France, England, Denmark, Germany, Switzerland, USA, Norway, Sweden and Russia.

Career Highlights:  Luke was the first and only Australian ever to have been invited to joust at the Sword of Honour tournament held at the Royal Armouries  of England.  He was also one of three knights in the world to re-introduce jousting with authentic historical lances.  He has lived and trained jousters and jousting horses on three different continents,  all the whilepursuing his career as an armourer.  Luke has won many titles in his long and illustrious career in medieval tournaments but loves nothing more than making accomplishments at home on his own horses and team mates.

To see this amazing Jouster, Sir Luke, please book your tickets here.

 

 

 

 

 

Lady Amanda Challen

Jousters of the 2018 Abbey Medieval Festival

Name : Lady Amanda Challen

Motto: Magnum vel domum ite (Go big or go home)

Heraldry: Per fess quartered dancettu azure and argent

Did you know? This will be Amanda’s second year competing as Jouster at the Abbey Medieval Festival.  Amanda Challen is a Brisbane local, hailing from Strathpine.  Born in Canberra, Amanda never quite grew out of “that horse phase” and while she is relatively new to the jousting scene, her skills have been twenty-six years in the making.   Amanda has broken-in and trained many horses in an array of different disciplines such as competitive trail-riding, show-jumping, dressage, mustering, and droving.   Amanda started out just as a trail rider, moved onto droving and then became a riding instructor.

When not sewing costumes, training horses and researching things historical –  Amanda works for Queensland Racing as Sample Collection Officer.

Horse:  Nyx  – Amanda’s horse ‘Nyx’ has a fondness for bells on her  harness,  which serve as a musical warning when riding out.

Amanda’s interest in jousting started with Nyx’s sire – Fenris, who graced the Saint Michael’ s tourney field for many years.  Nyx is the only horse Amanda has bred and the first horse she’s trained in jousting.  Nyx is 7 years old this year and stands at 16.1 hands high.  Nyx is approximately 652Kg and  is a Percheron cross Clydesdale.  Nyx tends to get quite upset if she misses out on any jousting, so much so that in 2016, not only did Nyx carry Amanda carefully and safely through her first joust, Nyx also carried Sir Luke for  three of his four runs as well.  Nyx was then invited to be used as a jousting mount at the St Ives international joust in September 2016,  where once again she proved herself as competent Jouster.

Nyx and Amanda became Mounted Marshall for the jousting spectacular at the end of 2014, when Nyx’s enthusiasm and calm demeanour, led to Nyx to be invited to be used as a jousting horse for the Abbey 2015.  At this tournament, Nyx carried an array of knights including Sir Cliff, Lady Vikki, Sir Justin and Sir John.  While the knights didn’t come to blows over who got to ride her, it was a close thing!

The following year they were both invited back as jousters:  Amanda’s first jousting tournament.

So,  if you would like to see Amanda, and other amazing Jousters at this year’s festival, click here to get your tickets !

 

 

Jouster Blog Series – Justin Holland

Jousters competing at the 2017 Abbey Medieval Festival

In this series of blogs, every week, we feature the wonderful jousters competing at this year’s festival.  This is a great opportunity for you to get to know our participants,  a little about their background, skill and abilities.  Keep posted!

 

Jouster Justin Holland

Jouster Justin Holland

Name:     Justin Holland

 

Motto:      Invictus in Animo  (Unconquered in Spirit)

 

Heraldry: Trois argent fleur de lys, gules ( three white Fleur de Lys on a red field)

 

Did you know?      Justin is one of the progenitors of the modern sport of jousting in Australia, and has  been jousting since 1996, and since then has jousted in most states of Australia, as well as New Zealand, Belgium, France and Poland.

Justin was hired to set up and train the joust team for the new Kryal Castle, Ballarat, in 2012.

Justin now runs Nova Hollandia Entertainment, a historical education and entertainment company in NSW

And there’s more…. Justin has a B.A. Hons in Classical Studies and Latin.  He is one of only six  people to have jousted in Tasmania, and the first!  He personally floated two horses to the Abbey Tournament in 2013 from Ballarat, Victoria….a round Heraldry for Justin Hollandtrip of 4000km!  He has been runner up at the Abbey Tournament 7 times!

Career highlights:  Abbey Medieval Festival Jouster champion 2006, 2012, 2014, and 2016.  Champion Jouster of Castle Gniew, Poland 2010

 

 

So,  if you would like to see Justin, and other amazing Jousters at this year’s festival, click here to get your tickets !

 

 

 

The Friday Joust Tourney – new to 2017 Abbey Medieval Festival

Friday Joust Abbey Medieval Festival 2017

 

 

Friday Afternoon Joust Tourney.

The Friday Afternoon Joust is not only a joust spectacular, which will delight in itself, but it will be a ‘behind the scenes’ look at the  making of the festival.

Up-close and personal, our Friday event will be an opportunity for you to see the jousting over a period of 2-3 hours, experience the thrill of the joust competition and get a feel for the festival – before the gates open the next morning.

While the joust will be as grand as a joust can be, with the smell of horses, the vision of  knights in shining armour, the roaring of the crowds, we would also like to expose the experience as an honest pre-construction of what actually goes on behind the scenes every year: the festival folk will still be in the throes of getting prepared,  a lot of hard work will still be going on.  We think this is a perfect opportunity to come experience a snap-shot of the festival, particularly for our senior citizens who might find the excitement of the full-days at the tournament too much.  This is a shortened and toned- down mini version of the tournament.

You will have an amazing opportunity to get up close and personal with some of our national and international jousters, so prepare your questions and follow our upcoming blogs regarding these amazing Jousters.

Gates open at 1.30, for a 2.30 start.  Snacks and drinks will be on sale throughout the afternoon, with the evening drawing to a close around 5.00pm.  From the Eastern Grandstand entry, groups of guests will be escorted to the jousting arena.  There, you will have the opportunity to witness international and Australian jousts.

The rest of the grounds will be still under construction, and therefore no access will be allowed to anywhere else on the grounds apart from the joust arena.  Our re-enactors and encampments will still be busy putting finishing touches to their amazing displays, so we cannot have them disturbed!

Tickets need to be pre-purchased, so book your seats quickly as we have a feeling they won’t last.

 

LAST MINUTE TIPS!

Tips and Tricks when planning for the Abbey Medieval Festival!

 

Yellow Shield

  • Ticket sales close on Thursday 6th at midnight!  If you’re not in by then, prepare to line up at the gate!
  • If you are using a GPS to get to the Festival, use Abbey Medieval Festival as your destination OR Old Toorbul Point Pt Caboolture – this is where is car park entrance is.
  • The Sponsors Village (outside the festival site) will be the last place you can by a Coke or Softdrink for 600 years!  Program sales, a Kombi photo station and much more!
  • Please keep a really good eye on your kiddies! We hate to see any kids missing their parents, (and vice versa) but if that does happen, we do have the security and a Sheriff’s tent tent just inside the main gates,  so come and see us there.
  • The Prepaid ticket lane is the to Right Hand side of the road when you arrive at the Gates, and yes, there are still many more tickets to be bought on the day! –
  • There have been a few mozzies around lately so pack that mozzie spray!
  • Gates open at 8:45am, so get here early to be at the front of the queue, so you can make the most out of your day! 
  • Dont forget to SHARE YOUR FUN! Abbey Festival Facebook and Instagram at #abbeyfestival2017  #visitmoretonbayregion #thisisqueensland #medievalstory
  • Whether you are a volunteer or a VIP – please stick your parking permit on the windscreen so that it can easily be read by the parking marshals (the dashboard doesn’t work with sun-glare!)
  • No alcohol on sale before 10.00 – please observe Queensland laws – we do!

 

Most of all HAVE A GREAT DAY!!

 

Medieval to Modern Transportation

Medieval to Modern Transportation – the Industrial Revolution and Beyond

While today we travel at great speed covering vast cross-country, or cross-continent distances within hours via plane, train, or automobile, Medieval peoples travelled far slower covering far less of a distance and none could have dreamt of the dawn of modern transportation experienced eons after their time had ended, burgeoning during the first industrial revolution and picking up speed during the technological revolution.

The evolution of primitive transportation to the modern transportation modes we have at our disposal today, thanks to brilliant minds such as aviation pioneers the Wright brothers Orville and Wilbur, steam engine tramway inventor Richard Trevithick, or car industry pioneers the Renault brothers Louis, Marcel and Fernand, would have been inconceivable to the people of the Middle Ages.

This was a time period in which travel by foot was the most common way of journeying across the land for the majority of people. Horses, donkeys, mules and oxen pulled carts were generally reserved for royalty and the wealthier classes who could afford such luxuries, as well as more well-off traders dealing in such transport goods as wool, and some other Medieval folk such as knights, diplomats/envoys and mounted soldiers.

Travel through History – Where did People in the Middle Ages Journey?

Most peasants travelled within a very small radius upon their King’s land, as far as to the nearest market to buy food, or to work, and then home again. Farmers would venture as far as to the nearest village to sell their produce. As peasants belonged to the land they were born upon, they had to receive permission from their King before leaving their King’s domain.

The noble classes would travel further, between their vast estates and on occasion further still for special events. Pilgrims and knights would venture far and wide and merchants would often opt for water travel by ship (equipped with sails, or rowed by men) to access foreign markets to sell their wares across the known world and bring back exotic goods.

 Travel through History – The Problem with Medieval Period Land Transport

European road networks ingeniously established by the Romans, fell into disrepair after Rome’s fall. What were once well maintained overland routes quickly turned to muddy tracks during winter and at best, uneven dirt paths throughout the rest of the year.

As overland roads were severely damaged (until around the 12th century when road rehabilitation began) and travel by land required extensive leg work, or access to horse, mule, donkey, oxen and/or carts, along with coin for tolls, tips, lodging, food, veterinaries (if an animal was used) and more, water travel proved by far the quickest, cheapest and most efficient option for transporting goods, especially for longer journeys.

Travel through History in Medieval Times How Fast Could People Journey?

Whilst the average Medieval peasant could walk at approx. 3 miles per hour, covering a mile every 20 minutes, professional couriers could trek up to 31, or 38 miles a day by foot! A horse could travel up to 40 to 60 miles a day before requiring a rest, whereas a cart pulled by oxen (depending upon the weight of the load and quality of the cart) could travel up to 10 miles per day, and a horse pulled cart 20.

It wasn’t until the bridging years between the Late Middle Ages and Early Renaissance period when human patronage of carts increased due to the improvement of roads coupled with the introduction of primitive carriage suspension technology and by the 15th Century, ships were built with 3 masts.

Medieval Period Transportation Improvements were Key to Fostering a New Age of More Modern Transportation

Like the first and second industrial revolution, transportation was vital to social improvement, economic prosperity and European development during the Medieval period. The burgeoning transportation innovations of the Middle Ages and the discovery of the Americas helped bring about the booming economy enjoyed by the eras thereafter.

Similarly, echoing the benefits brought about by Medieval advancements, more modern transportation developments harnessed up until around the First World War also sparked a period of vast social, economic and technological improvement across primarily Europe, Britain and America.

The First and Second Industrial (Technological) Revolution Sparked the Evolution of Modern Transportation

In 1898, Louis Renault invented his first car – the Voiturette, along with the direct drive gearbox which greatly improved driving efficiency, allowing for noise reduction, higher torque at lower RPM, along with more advantages as well. Amongst other Renault accomplishments with his brothers through their Renault company, they adopted modernised automobile principles to improve car design and ultimately evolve this mode of road transport.

By 1907 50% of London’s taxis were Renault’s.

Much like the Medieval wooden ships such as the Galley, Trade-Cog and longboats of the Vikings, which were used as both vessels to move goods and people, as well as vessels to transport soldiers and/or wage high-seas warfare, 500 of Renault’s taxis were used during World War I to transport troops to impede the Germans advance upon Paris in 1914.

Car usage increased after WWII and by 1959 around 32% of British families owned a car.

Today people travel by car, plane, train, bus, ship and even space shuttle. The transport modes which will likely be pioneered eons from now, will probably be just as inconceivable to us, 21st century folk, as Louis Renault’s the Voiturette would be to the Medieval peoples.

As the Frenchman Jean-Baptiste Alphone Karr once wrote during the Industrial Revolution: “the more things change, the more they stay the same”…

Kids In Crowds

kids

The Abbey Medieval Festival is Australia’s largest and most popular Festival of its kind. Whilst this in itself is an amazing accomplishment, it can also be a HUGE worry on the minds of parents and carers.

Being parents ourselves, we know that losing your child ANYWHERE is a parents worst nightmare. The Festival has procedures in place to return lost children to their parents in the quickest way possible, and we have also put together this list of some clever tips and tricks for you to hopefully avoid what can be a horrible situation.

TIP 1:

Before you arrive at the Festival, familiarise yourself with the map of the grounds. Know where the information desk is, as well as the security tent and the first aid station. Any lost kids who are found will be brought up to the security tent (near the entrance), so if you find yourself in this position, this will be the first place you need to head.

lost kids

TIP 2:

If your child is too young to memorise their parents name and phone number, write it down on something they will have on them the whole day, where it cannot be lost or rubbed off. A great idea is to write on the tag of clothing, or in felt tip pen on the childs skin (hand, etc) and cover with clear nail polish. You can also write your name and number on a card (or use your business card) and stick it in their pocket.

lost kids

TIP 3:

Who doesnt love a good selfie? As soon as you arrive at the Festival, take a photo of your child, so you have a photo of what they are wearing, hair style, etc.

TIP 4:

Choose a big, obvious landmark, building or tent somewhere central in the Festival grounds and tell your child that if they are to lose you, they need to go to this particular spot. A good one for slightly older kids.

TIP 5:

We dont have to remind you about this, but always teach your children about stranger danger and safety. Triple Zero Hero is a great site that teaches kids about emergency services and the like.

lost kids

TIP 6:

Remember, almost everyone is willing to to help out someone in need. If you find yourself in this position, just ask any of the friendly volunteers, stall holders, reeanctors or security personnel and we will be more than willing to help.

 

EX LIBRIS

Meet the Reenactor Groups 2016

EX LIBRIS

libris

Ex Libris is a Living History group which, as it’s primary focus, presents the middle and upper class peoples from Western and Central Europe, between 1375 and 1415. They have other areas of focus as well,  which include but are not limited to: late Antiquity and the Great Migrations, through to the Renaissance. They strive to present high quality individual historical impressions with a focus on education, living history and experimental archeology. This group and its members are looking to understand the medieval period by researching and recreating the fashions, cuisine, art and lifestyles.

While they are a small group, their activities include, but are not restricted to; research, practice and demonstration of historical martial arts, equestrian skills, religious practices, music, cooking, costuming, metal, ceramic, leather, and wood work, and other skills appropriate to the subject. Ex Libris has performed at medieval fairs, like the Abbey Medieval Festival, as well as participating in small private events, lectures and demonstrations. Several of their members write blogs and contribute to other medieval pages.

Ex Libris is made up of several experienced and dedicated researchers and re-enactors, with a combined experience and knowledge of over 50+ years. What they lack in size they make up for in in enthusiasm and dedication to history.

What will you see when you come into the Ex Libris camp?

libris

A hive of activity with and smiling faces ready to answer all your questions. Ex Libris has two unofficial mottos: No. 1: “No one goes away without having their questions answered”. No. 2: “Have fun!”

When you meet Ex Libris, you not only come away with a deep sense of their passion for history, but their excitement and dedication is infectious.

This camp is a must for all guests at this years Festival!

STILL more to come on the Reenactor groups

KARVAN-SARAY INCORPORATED

Meet the Reenactor Groups 2016

KARVAN-SARAY INC.

karvan-saray

Karvan-saray Incorporated (once known as the Kazuri Tribe) is a medieval re-enactment group who re-enact life in a caravansarai (camel inn) on the Silk Road during the late 15th Century. As traders moved along the Silk Road, they needed somewhere to stay. This meant that the caravansarai was constantly changing and influenced by a broad range of peoples from across Europe to the Far East. A caravansarai would be a place of safety for a broad number of people, who could trade, greet old friends and establish new trade and family connections. This means we represent a multicultural cross section of people and cultures. Our chosen location is a seven day camel ride west from Damascus.

As a group, Karvan-Saray research the historical arts, crafts and lifestyles of people in the Middle East in the 15th Century. Throughout the year, they run workshops for the public based around these arts and crafts. Depending upon when you enter their caravansarai, you will be enticed by fragrant cooking, and be able to participate in all activities from Henna application to drumming, from Middle Eastern Story Telling to spinning. And, of course, you will be welcomed like old friends.

karvan-saray

This group is are based in Northern Brisbane, and welcome new and enthusiastic members to join in the fun!

Immerse yourself in this groups activities this year by buying your tickets now!

More reenactor groups here soon!

THE COMPANY OF THE PHOENIX

Meet the Reenactor Groups 2016

THE COMPANY OF THE PHOENIX

phoenix

company of the Phoenix trains in south Brisbane but has members from all over including Ipswich, north Brisbane and even Rockhampton.” Or something similar?”

In 1435-1485, Europe was ravaged by war, plagues and continuous conflict. Men supported their king or Nobility, and embarked on long campaigns in foreign lands. But after the wars and conflicts of the 14th and 15th centuries, men at arms were scarce. Soldiers were gathered from all walks of life to fight for cause or country.

But those surviving did not want to return to their previous lives. These men disbanded, becoming soldiers for profit; working for themselves, or for the highest bidder. These mercenary soldiers formed free companies governed by no one. Travelling and settling wherever they pleased and joined by their wives and children, they were followed by other trades and craftsmen, their tented encampments becoming self-sufficient travelling villages.

The Company of The Phoenix  is a medieval living history group who train in South Brisbane, QLD. They have members from all over Queensland including Ipswich, North Brisbane and even Rockhampton. The Company of the Phoenix recreates the High Medieval Period as a free Company travelling through the cities and states of Europe, during the years 1435 – 1485. The Company portrays a wide variety of personas, ranging from Nobility, pilgrims, merchants, tradesmen and archers, to men-at-arms, knights, and brewers.

phoenix

The encampment, clothing, food, arms and armour are all meticulously researched from manuscripts, paintings, and archaeological finds, and display what could have been seen in a 15th century village.

Phoenix members recreate the 15th century way of life and enjoy feasting, dancing, leisurely pursuits, and travelling the Tournament Circuit, including attending events like the Abbey Medieval Festival.

Less than a week until you can meet The Company of the Phoenix!

More on Reenactor groups that attend The Abbey Festival soon. 

COMPANIE DRACO ROUTIERS

Meet the Reenactor Groups

COMPANIE DRACO ROUTIERS

draco

Often made up of disillusioned or exiled nobles, bastards and third sons, army captains aspiring for more fame and those seeking to make a bigger name for themselves, mercenary companies enjoyed a great deal of freedom and mobility, venturing far and wide in search of glory and riches. Anyone with some skill and drive could join a mercenary company, and these groups were often made up of members and followers from all walks of life since your social class and status were less important than your skill with a weapon and your use to the company.

The most successful companies were made up of disciplined, seasoned fighters and were led by fearless captains who ruthlessly built the reputation of their company to win the richest contracts.

Companie Draco Routiers formed as a band of sword loving, mead drinking fighters set on recreating the experience of a wealthy & successful mercenary company during the late 14th Century.

Drawing its origins from the exiled Saxon nobles of the Kingdom of Wessex, Dracos’ encampment and tournament puts on display about the lives of knights, foot soldiers, nobles and camp followers alike, during this period in history with a focus on the martial aspect.

draco

Arms and armoury are our passion and our combatants love nothing more than competing to prove their skills and prowess on the field and in the lists, in period accurate harness and weapons.

When not engaged in combat, Draco members can be seen around the campfire enjoying the spoils of victory with traditional ciders and meads made by our club brewer, and discussing tactics for the next battle.

Companie Draco Routiers will be taking the field in a foot tournament on the Sunday of the Abbey Medieval Festival, and keeping their skills sharp in the pas de armes arena in the 14th-15th century village ‘Kirkby’ during the Festival weekend.

See Companie Draco Routers this year!

A few more Reenactors groups still to come.

HISTORIA GERMANICA

Meet the Reenactor Groups 2016

HISTORIA GERMANICA

 

 

Historia Germanica is a reenactment group based in Queensland, that represents the camp life of a 16th century Landsknetch group. They are a small group representing a gun crew, and they wear and make all their own amazing and authentic costumes and gear, from the early Renaissance time period. This group have 3 cannons which they have fired yearly at The Abbey Medieval Festival, this being a greatly anticipated part of the Festival.

After participating at the Abbey Medieval Festival for many years, 2016 marks the last year you will see Historia Germanica, they are retiring! But fear not, the gun will be back next year in the hands of another group, let’s just say it is their neighbours to the south 😉

This year, for their last year, you can see Historia Germanica and their cannons, and listen to their interesting and educational talk in the Castle Arena both Saturday and Sunday.

From Historia Germanica:

“We would like to thank the Abbey for all their hard work making the festival come alive. We have really enjoyed our years of bringing a bit of noise to the festival”

The Effect of Cannons on Troupes‘ is scheduled for 11:45 on Saturday 9th, and 2:15 on Sunday the 10th.

Buy your tickets to the Festival now!

More on the final groups of reenactors here soon

Knights Order of Lion Rampant

Meet the Reenactor Groups 2016

Knights Order of Lion Rampant

lion

The Knights Order of Lion Rampant (KOLR) is a Brisbane-based living history group dedicated to recreating the spectacle and excitement of 14th century high medieval tournament.

Formed in the early 1990’s as a Tournament Society with a focus on structured and trained, but not choreographed, Medieval Combat, Knights Order of Lion Rampant have developed an enthusiastic following amongst Festival audiences, and an enviable reputation amongst both local and international peers.

KOLR focus on the culture of western and central European nobility during the High Middle Ages. 

The fashions, arms, armour and accessories used by the group are typical of the closing years of the 14th century.

lion

In the past, KOLR have re-created gun crews, a small Free Company of foot soldiers and archers, jousting and other mounted combat. They have performed knighting ceremonies, trials by ordeal, Latin Mass and even staged (to their knowledge), the first Allegorical Tournament since the end of the Middle Ages.

Some of their members have embarked on some experimental archeology on their search for the ideals of feminine beauty in the Middle Ages and come up with a display on the creation and application of an exceptional range of beauty products for both the Medieval woman and man!

Knights Order of Lion Rampant has performed at many Festivals, Faires and shows, including the Abbey Medieval Festival & Tournament, at which they will be attending and performing again this year. Many members of KOLR also actively volunteer at other events for the Abbey Museum, and are a valued part of our community.

See KOLR and their amazing displays this year!

More on other reenactor groups here soon.

Kirkby Village

Introducing our brand new 14-15th Century Village;

Kirbky!

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kirkby

 

For the 2016 Abbey Medieval Festival, in coordination with our amazing 14th and 15th Century re-enactment groups, we have embarked on a completely new concept – The Village of Kirkby. Now, instead of viewing the encampments from the outside, you are invited to enter the Village and become immersed in the 14th and 15th Centuries.

Kirkby Village is arranged so that you can walk backwards through time, seeing and experiencing how life changed over this period starting at the tail end of the 15th Century, with the groups Re-enacting Independently For Fun and Das Torichte Leben, and ending in the 14th Century, with the groups Draco Routiers and Knights of the Longdog.

While in the Kirkby Marketplace, at the south end of the village, you might like to peruse the fine array of goods for sale. Later, you could learn more about medieval cooking by watching a Medieval Kitchen at work on the west side of the village. See the re-enactors rest between battles in their Banquet Hall, and in the north end of the village, you can watch fighters train in the Kirkby List, or listen to some music from the group ‘Wayward’.

When it’s time to leave the Village and continue exploring all that the Festival has to offer, why not head out the Westgate and treat yourself to the delights of the Middle Eastern Quarter, with its dancers, drummers and oil wrestlers? Or perhaps you could take in a lecture at the University Pavilion, visit the encampments of Knights’ Order of Lion Rampant, Shuvani; Egipcianos Campañia or multi-period group Ex Libris.

Go north, and you will find yourself at the Joust Arena, or why not visit The Commons to watch a performance? The East Gate will lead you towards the Castle List and the mysteries of The Crusader Quarter.

Performances, shows, displays and workshops in Kirby Village include:

Company of the Phoenix 

kirkbyCompany Draco Routiers

kirbky

Company of the Radiant Heart 

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Das Torichte Leben

kirkby

Knights of the Longdog

kirkby

Reenacting Independently For Fun

kirkby

St James Road

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Company of the Dove

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as well as Scions of Mars and the music group ‘Wayward’.

Make sure you stop in and say hi, and explore everything that Kirkby has to offer!

New England Medieval Arts Society

Meet the Reenactor Groups 2016

NEW ENGLAND MEDIEVAL ARTS SOCIETY

(NEMAS)

new
The New England Medieval Arts Society celebrates an amazing Thirty Years of Existence this year!

To celebrate, NEMAS partied hard at the Armidale Pine Forest with The Easter Gathering 2016. Folk travel from far afield as Perth, New Zealand Melbourne and Townsville and everywhere in between to what became the largest Re-enactment camp out in the Southern Hemisphere.
The NEMAS group continued to spread their love and passion for historical fun at The Glen Innes Standing Stones Celtic Festival where their encampment was interactive and as the combat demonstrations were lively and most humorous, winning acclaim.
NEMAS loves to travel further afield and has just recently supported another fantastic re-enactment group, Rognvalds Lith, with their Viking Village Solstice in Lismore.

This year, NEMAS invite all to come and catch up with them at The Abbey Medieval Festival as they present their take on an Anglo Saxon Encampment, somewhere near the Dane Law in Wessex.

 

Come and see New England Medieval Arts Society at the Abbey Medieval Festival this year!

Still more reenactor groups to come!