, , ,

THE COMPANY OF THE PHOENIX

Meet the Reenactor Groups 2016

THE COMPANY OF THE PHOENIX

phoenix

company of the Phoenix trains in south Brisbane but has members from all over including Ipswich, north Brisbane and even Rockhampton.” Or something similar?”

In 1435-1485, Europe was ravaged by war, plagues and continuous conflict. Men supported their king or Nobility, and embarked on long campaigns in foreign lands. But after the wars and conflicts of the 14th and 15th centuries, men at arms were scarce. Soldiers were gathered from all walks of life to fight for cause or country.

But those surviving did not want to return to their previous lives. These men disbanded, becoming soldiers for profit; working for themselves, or for the highest bidder. These mercenary soldiers formed free companies governed by no one. Travelling and settling wherever they pleased and joined by their wives and children, they were followed by other trades and craftsmen, their tented encampments becoming self-sufficient travelling villages.

The Company of The Phoenix  is a medieval living history group who train in South Brisbane, QLD. They have members from all over Queensland including Ipswich, North Brisbane and even Rockhampton. The Company of the Phoenix recreates the High Medieval Period as a free Company travelling through the cities and states of Europe, during the years 1435 – 1485. The Company portrays a wide variety of personas, ranging from Nobility, pilgrims, merchants, tradesmen and archers, to men-at-arms, knights, and brewers.

phoenix

The encampment, clothing, food, arms and armour are all meticulously researched from manuscripts, paintings, and archaeological finds, and display what could have been seen in a 15th century village.

Phoenix members recreate the 15th century way of life and enjoy feasting, dancing, leisurely pursuits, and travelling the Tournament Circuit, including attending events like the Abbey Medieval Festival.

Less than a week until you can meet The Company of the Phoenix!

More on Reenactor groups that attend The Abbey Festival soon. 

, , ,

COMPANIE DRACO ROUTIERS

Meet the Reenactor Groups

COMPANIE DRACO ROUTIERS

draco

Often made up of disillusioned or exiled nobles, bastards and third sons, army captains aspiring for more fame and those seeking to make a bigger name for themselves, mercenary companies enjoyed a great deal of freedom and mobility, venturing far and wide in search of glory and riches. Anyone with some skill and drive could join a mercenary company, and these groups were often made up of members and followers from all walks of life since your social class and status were less important than your skill with a weapon and your use to the company.

The most successful companies were made up of disciplined, seasoned fighters and were led by fearless captains who ruthlessly built the reputation of their company to win the richest contracts.

Companie Draco Routiers formed as a band of sword loving, mead drinking fighters set on recreating the experience of a wealthy & successful mercenary company during the late 14th Century.

Drawing its origins from the exiled Saxon nobles of the Kingdom of Wessex, Dracos’ encampment and tournament puts on display about the lives of knights, foot soldiers, nobles and camp followers alike, during this period in history with a focus on the martial aspect.

draco

Arms and armoury are our passion and our combatants love nothing more than competing to prove their skills and prowess on the field and in the lists, in period accurate harness and weapons.

When not engaged in combat, Draco members can be seen around the campfire enjoying the spoils of victory with traditional ciders and meads made by our club brewer, and discussing tactics for the next battle.

Companie Draco Routiers will be taking the field in a foot tournament on the Sunday of the Abbey Medieval Festival, and keeping their skills sharp in the pas de armes arena in the 14th-15th century village ‘Kirkby’ during the Festival weekend.

See Companie Draco Routers this year!

A few more Reenactors groups still to come.

, , , , ,

HISTORIA GERMANICA

Meet the Reenactor Groups 2016

HISTORIA GERMANICA

historia

 

Historia Germanica is a reenactment group based in Queensland, that represents the camp life of a 16th century Landsknetch group. They are a small group representing a gun crew, and they wear and make all their own amazing and authentic costumes and gear, from the early Renaissance time period. This group have 3 cannons which they have fired yearly at The Abbey Medieval Festival, this being a greatly anticipated part of the Festival.

After participating at the Abbey Medieval Festival for many years, 2016 marks the last year you will see Historia Germanica, they are retiring! But fear not, the gun will be back next year in the hands of another group, let’s just say it is their neighbours to the south 😉

This year, for their last year, you can see Historia Germanica and their cannons, and listen to their interesting and educational talk in the Castle Arena both Saturday and Sunday.

From Historia Germanica:

“We would like to thank the Abbey for all their hard work making the festival come alive. We have really enjoyed our years of bringing a bit of noise to the festival”

The Effect of Cannons on Troupes‘ is scheduled for 11:45 on Saturday 9th, and 2:15 on Sunday the 10th.

Buy your tickets to the Festival now!

More on the final groups of reenactors here soon

, , ,

Knights Order of Lion Rampant

Meet the Reenactor Groups 2016

Knights Order of Lion Rampant

lion

The Knights Order of Lion Rampant (KOLR) is a Brisbane-based living history group dedicated to recreating the spectacle and excitement of 14th century high medieval tournament.

Formed in the early 1990’s as a Tournament Society with a focus on structured and trained, but not choreographed, Medieval Combat, Knights Order of Lion Rampant have developed an enthusiastic following amongst Festival audiences, and an enviable reputation amongst both local and international peers.

KOLR focus on the culture of western and central European nobility during the High Middle Ages. 

The fashions, arms, armour and accessories used by the group are typical of the closing years of the 14th century.

lion

In the past, KOLR have re-created gun crews, a small Free Company of foot soldiers and archers, jousting and other mounted combat. They have performed knighting ceremonies, trials by ordeal, Latin Mass and even staged (to their knowledge), the first Allegorical Tournament since the end of the Middle Ages.

Some of their members have embarked on some experimental archeology on their search for the ideals of feminine beauty in the Middle Ages and come up with a display on the creation and application of an exceptional range of beauty products for both the Medieval woman and man!

Knights Order of Lion Rampant has performed at many Festivals, Faires and shows, including the Abbey Medieval Festival & Tournament, at which they will be attending and performing again this year. Many members of KOLR also actively volunteer at other events for the Abbey Museum, and are a valued part of our community.

See KOLR and their amazing displays this year!

More on other reenactor groups here soon.

, , , ,

Kirkby Village

Introducing our brand new 14-15th Century Village;

Kirbky!

kirkby

kirkby

 

For the 2016 Abbey Medieval Festival, in coordination with our amazing 14th and 15th Century re-enactment groups, we have embarked on a completely new concept – The Village of Kirkby. Now, instead of viewing the encampments from the outside, you are invited to enter the Village and become immersed in the 14th and 15th Centuries.

Kirkby Village is arranged so that you can walk backwards through time, seeing and experiencing how life changed over this period starting at the tail end of the 15th Century, with the groups Re-enacting Independently For Fun and Das Torichte Leben, and ending in the 14th Century, with the groups Draco Routiers and Knights of the Longdog.

While in the Kirkby Marketplace, at the south end of the village, you might like to peruse the fine array of goods for sale. Later, you could learn more about medieval cooking by watching a Medieval Kitchen at work on the west side of the village. See the re-enactors rest between battles in their Banquet Hall, and in the north end of the village, you can watch fighters train in the Kirkby List, or listen to some music from the group ‘Wayward’.

When it’s time to leave the Village and continue exploring all that the Festival has to offer, why not head out the Westgate and treat yourself to the delights of the Middle Eastern Quarter, with its dancers, drummers and oil wrestlers? Or perhaps you could take in a lecture at the University Pavilion, visit the encampments of Knights’ Order of Lion Rampant, Shuvani; Egipcianos Campañia or multi-period group Ex Libris.

Go north, and you will find yourself at the Joust Arena, or why not visit The Commons to watch a performance? The East Gate will lead you towards the Castle List and the mysteries of The Crusader Quarter.

Performances, shows, displays and workshops in Kirby Village include:

Company of the Phoenix 

kirkbyCompany Draco Routiers

kirbky

Company of the Radiant Heart 

kirkby

Das Torichte Leben

kirkby

Knights of the Longdog

kirkby

Reenacting Independently For Fun

kirkby

St James Road

kirkby

Company of the Dove

kirkby

as well as Scions of Mars and the music group ‘Wayward’.

Make sure you stop in and say hi, and explore everything that Kirkby has to offer!

, , , ,

New England Medieval Arts Society

Meet the Reenactor Groups 2016

NEW ENGLAND MEDIEVAL ARTS SOCIETY

(NEMAS)

new
The New England Medieval Arts Society celebrates an amazing Thirty Years of Existence this year!

To celebrate, NEMAS partied hard at the Armidale Pine Forest with The Easter Gathering 2016. Folk travel from far afield as Perth, New Zealand Melbourne and Townsville and everywhere in between to what became the largest Re-enactment camp out in the Southern Hemisphere.
The NEMAS group continued to spread their love and passion for historical fun at The Glen Innes Standing Stones Celtic Festival where their encampment was interactive and as the combat demonstrations were lively and most humorous, winning acclaim.
NEMAS loves to travel further afield and has just recently supported another fantastic re-enactment group, Rognvalds Lith, with their Viking Village Solstice in Lismore.

This year, NEMAS invite all to come and catch up with them at The Abbey Medieval Festival as they present their take on an Anglo Saxon Encampment, somewhere near the Dane Law in Wessex.

nemas

Come and see New England Medieval Arts Society at the Abbey Medieval Festival this year!

Still more reenactor groups to come! 

 

, , ,

The Lute

The Lute;

What is it, and where does it come from?

 

The lute is a pear shaped, stringed instrument, originating some time during the Renaissance Era where it was known as the instrument of Kings and Queens. The symbol of magic and the power of music, the lute could be heard in the theatre in the music of Shakespeare’s plays, and was also popular amongst common people, playing the popular tunes of the day in pubs and on street corners.

Coming to Europe in the Middle Ages, the lute, which then had only five ‘courses’ or pairs of strings, was played with a quill plectrum, very similar to the Arabic ‘ud, from which is derives it name and distinctive shape.

It wasn’t until the late 15th century that the lute really came into its own, when it was realised that it could be played with finger instead of the quill. With the addition of a sixth course, and the slight changes to its shape making its body more elongated, the lute attained a more elegant status, setting itself up for over 150 years of musical acknowledgement.

By the end of the seventeenth century though, the lutes popularity had decreased. The quiet and sultry lute simple could not complete with the rise of the orchestra and opera.

lute

Here at the Abbey Museum we are very lucky to have a special lady who loves to come and play her beautiful lutes for the entertainment of our visitors and guests. Gillian Nicholson will once again be playing her lutes in the Museum during the Festival Weekend, so if you would like some quiet time out from the hustle and bustle that is the Medieval Festival, be sure to come and visit Gillian in the Museum to be swept away by her ravishing tones and beautiful music.

, , , ,

Stalls at the Medieval Festival

The DELICIOUS food available each year is just one of the important parts that make The Abbey Medieval Festival the biggest and best around!

festival

Do you have your favourites that you just can’t seem to go past like the Bacon and Eggs or the Toffee Apples?

Or are you more of a sweet tooth and find yourself drifting towards the Churros and the Profferjes?

Will you perhaps be trying something new and different this year, such as the sweet or savoury Hungarian Langos? Or maybe something from the Spanish Tapas Bar?

If you find something truly delicious (which we know you definitely will) or you would like to share your tried and tested favourites, make sure you hashtag #AbbeyFestivalFood on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter – by doing this, you will be voting for the “peoples choice” for the Best Abbey Festival Stall this year.

 

Find some truly unique and special items at Australias biggest Medieval Marketplace!

festival

When making your way around the Festival grounds this year, do yourself a favour and take your time exploring the Medieval Marketplace. There are treasures of all sorts to be found here, such as Medieval Furs, Beeswax Candles, Pottery, Fine Felts, and much much more!

Have your medieval portrait done, treat yourself to some fruit wine, and stop in and say hi to us at the Abbey Museum Stall while you are here!

Again, don’t forget to share your amazing finds on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter by hash tagging us at #AbbeyFestivalCraft to vote for your favourite stall!

Whatever direction your taste buds take you, whatever medieval treasures you are hoping to find, you can be sure there will be something (or more than 1 somethings!) at this years Medieval Festival for you!

 

Official hashtags to vote for your favourite food or craft stall:

#AbbeyFestivalFood

#AbbeyFestivalCraft 

, ,

The Templars

Meet the Reenactors 2016

THE TEMPLARS

templars

The Templars are a historical re-enactment group based in Brisbane. They portray the military order of the Poor Fellow Knights of Christ and of the Temple of Solomon, more commonly known to history as ‘The Templars’.

At the Abbey Medieval Festival this year, you’ll find the Templars encampment in the Crusader Quarter.

The Templars host the Kingdom of Heaven Tournament on Saturday afternoon in the castle arena, where they contest the field against invited knights from the other Crusader era re-enactment groups.

You will also see them working closely with their friends at the Order of the Horse, who portray the Templars’ historical adversaries, the Saracens.  On Sunday afternoon, you’ll see Saladin and his mounted warriors attack the Templars in the Battle of Hattin.

And each day, in the late morning in the Crusader Quarter, you will hear the glorious Gregorian chant performed by Schola Cantorum, as the Templars bless the pilgrims before they set out for the Holy Places.

templars

Historically, Templars had the task of safely escorting pilgrims to Jerusalem and the other Holy Places in the Jordan Valley, and held castles that protected the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem. They wore a distinctive garb of a white woollen cloak bearing a red cross, and carried shields of simple black and white – the same colours as their traditional standard, known as the Beauceant.

In their encampment at the Abbey Festival, the Templars depict a camp outside the walls of the Templar stronghold of Chateau Pelerin on the shores of the Mediterranean. The year is 1229, when a truce had been signed by Frederick II that once again allowed Christian pilgrims passage to the Holy Places in Jerusalem and the Jordan Valley, which is now held by the Saracens.

Come and visit the Templars encampment and see their exciting performances at this years Festival!

Read more about other Reenactor groups here soon

 

, , , ,

SAINT JAMES ROAD

Meet the Reenactors 2016

SAINT JAMES ROAD

saint james road

Saint James Road is a living history group of enthusiastic people who have a love of 14th Century Society (1340 –1420).
This group strive to reconstruct aspects of medieval life and culture using a hands on approach, encouraging members to make their own historically accurate props and pieces, and pass on new and old skills as they do so.

Within Saint James Road, they have vast range of different personas portrayed, from Pilgrims, Journeymen and Commoners to Merchants, Knights and Ladies. They have a strong belief of including the whole family in their group, as the children are the future of Living History.
The members of Saint James Road share a strong focus on the functioning society within this era in history and the frame work in which it operates. By referring to iconography, relics and manuscripts, they aim to reconstruct as many aspects as they possibly can, of this period. Members are encouraged to embrace the culture and history and portray a specific role in European society between the years 1340 and 1420. Through personal research, group discussions and workshops, members will be encouraged to make their period accurate equipment by themselves. This includes costuming and accessories, arms and armour, household items, furniture and tents, in order to understand this time in history and entertain both themselves and members of the public alike.

james

St. James Road group members wish to depict the diversity of this changing era of history in all areas of society as they learn and grow, while enjoying their Living History hobby.

Come and join this group at The Abbey Medieval Festival 2016 for a taste of medieval life and culture in the 14th Century!

Buy your tickets now!

Check back soon for more on other reenactor groups!

, , ,

Medieval Strawberries

A Brief History of the Strawberry of Medieval Times

strawberries

Though cultivated strawberries are enjoyed far and wide today, the strawberry did not always enjoy such wide-spread favouritism when we look back to Medieval times.

The wild strawberry – Fragaria vesca is an aggregate fruit, a sweet and edible member of the rosaceae (rose family) which flourished freely during the Medieval Period. The humble Fragaria vesca is smaller than today’s cultivated strawberries, it abounded in woods throughout Medieval Europe, but was not cultivated until the late Middle Ages and went undocumented until the 1300’s.

 

A Medieval History of the Humble Strawberry

 

  • To the medieval peoples, the strawberry represented righteousness and perfection, strawberry          designs were oft carved into altars and around the tops of colonnades and pillars within cathedrals and churches to symbolise these revered traits.
  • Similarly, medieval artists depicted the Virgin Mary with strawberries to symbolise perfection and righteousness.
  • Fresh wild strawberries plucked from the plant were primarily consumed by peasants, they were thought not to have been eaten fresh by nobility as unprepared, raw food was oft looked upon with suspicion – the upper classes believed eating fresh fruit was dangerous.
  • The upper classes would only indulge in strawberries when boiled, baked, or cooked into such tasty treats as strawberry pudding, or in pottages, a primitive type of cookery enjoyed by all classes of medieval peoples. Pottages included such dishes as thick soup, porridge and stews.
  • This sweet was served cooked, boiled, or baked at important events during the Middle Ages to bring about peace and prosperity.
  • Pregnant women of the Medieval Period avoided eating, or touching raw, or cooked strawberries due to superstition – they feared their babies would be born with strawberry-shaped birthmarks if they were to come into contact, or nibble anything containing Fragaria vesca.
  • The strawberry was used as a medicinal herb as Fragaria vesca was believed to ease sunburn pain, relieve skin blemishes, brighten discoloured teeth and cure various digestive ailments such as diarrhoea, digestive upset and gout.
  • For a number of years during the High Middle ages in the 12th century, Abbess Saint Hildegard von Binger announced strawberries were not fit for eating as they grew on the ground where toads and snakes likely crept over them. Local political figures heeded her words and made similar statements discouraging the people from consuming them, amongst Europeans, this belief held for many years.

 

Strawberries in Medieval Norse Mythology

 

The strawberry was associated with the goddess Frigga, patroness of matrimony and Oden’s wife. In Norse mythology Frigga gave strawberries as a symbol to the spirits of young children who had died in infancy who would then ascend to heaven hidden within a strawberry.

The strawberry was also connected to Freyja, the Norse goddess of love and ruler of the afterlife field Fólkvangr, where half of those who die in battle end up in the Nordic afterlife (the other half reaching Valhalla). The strawberry was one of her symbols and her sacred food. In Norse myths she is depicted as knowledgeable and powerful, a captivatingly beautiful mistress to the gods, a mother, a sister, the daughter of Njörðr and wife of Óðr.

Freyja drives a chariot pulled by cats and cries tears of gold. She is associated with beauty, fertility, love, gold, war, death and a type of Norse shamanistic sorcery.

 

The Beginning of Strawberry Cultivation

 

Strawberry cultivation began sporadically in early 1300’s France, mostly within home gardens. Then in 1368, King Charles V had 1200 strawberry plants planted in his Parisian gardens at The Louvre blanketing it in a sea of red. This was followed a few years later by the Duke and Duchess of Burgundy planting a four-block area of land on their estate near Dijon with strawberries.

This humble, sweet member of the rose family came to prominence later on in the 16th century around 1560 during The Renaissance. King Henry IV’s physician Bruyerin-Champier reported English ladies had grown very fond of the strawberry and were cultivating these plants at home and indulging in strawberries and cream.

The wild strawberry was also used in medieval cooking to make strawberry wine, strawberries and cream, strawberry jams, jellies and strawberry shortcake, the

Aside from being revered as a tasty edible, the strawberry itself and depictions of the strawberry in myth and art served a number of other uses during the Medieval Period.

 

Visit Moreton Bay Region to Celebrate the Strawberry

 

The Moreton Bay Region is home to several commercialised strawberry farms, and this August 2016 locals and visitors to the region are invited to celebrate this favourite aggregate fruit at the region’s annual Strawberry Festival hosted by Sandstone Point Hotel on Saturday 20th August from 11am into the evening.

, ,

Medieval Fires

Great Fires of the Medieval Period

london fires

Great fires have ravaged the earth throughout recorded history, from the days of the Romans, through the Medieval Period and into modern times. These days we recognise the importance of fire safety precautions and install smoke alarms in commercial buildings and homes to protect people, property and contents (amongst other safeguards). In Medieval Times however, there was no such thing as ‘fire safety’.

The homes of peasants, shops and bridges were constructed using highly flammable building materials including straw, wattle & daub and wood. While wood played a role within grander structures built for religious purposes such as cathedrals, or manors and castles belonging to upper classes and nobility, they also incorporated far more fire resistant materials such as slate tiled roofs, and stone was predominantly the main structural component.

However, despite the dwellings of richer Medieval classes using more fire resistant construction materials, cathedrals, churches, manors and castles nevertheless still burned during the Middle Ages.

Medieval London was a City Built to Burn

 

In Medieval London, fires were a common occurrence as houses were mostly built with combustible materials – wood and pitch and tightly crowded together, standing side by side with manufacturing and commerce buildings on narrow, winding streets allowing for no firebreaks. No organised, official fire brigade operated in London during the Middle Ages and local residents had to fight fires with leather buckets and water squirts, the use of which normally had little effect when it came to extinguishing fierce flames.

The most infamous of all of London’s infernos is the 1666 AD Great Fire of London which scourged most of the city, burning to ash approximately 80% of it, yet taking surprisingly few lives, only 4 casualties were officially recorded, but more are likely as the fire incinerated human remains. It raged on for days and though loss of life was minimal thousands found themselves homeless and in financial ruin.

Though London’s Great Fire of 1666 is perhaps Britain’s most well-known, the city of London was savaged by other blazes, some of which resulted in wide-spread destruction and a staggering loss of life completely eclipsing the number of casualties during the 1666 blaze.

A Medieval Timeline of Ferocious London Fires

 

675 AD: London’s original St Paul’s Cathedral (not Christopher Wren’s 4th incarnation which pierces the skyline today) established by King Ethelbert of Kent as home to East Saxons first bishop, Mellitus burned to the ground.

1087 AD: The rebuilt 2nd St Paul’s Cathedral in London burnt down.

1135 AD: One of the two Great Medieval Fires of London. This blaze occurred on Pentecost and was so severe that it destroyed most of the city between London Bridge in the east and St Clement Danes in Westminster to the west.

1212 AD: The Great Fire of Southwark was one of the two Great Medieval Fires of London and speculated to have claimed around 3,000 souls. It began south of the Thames in Southwark, destroying the cathedral church of St Mary Overie aka Our Lady of the Canons and most of Borough High Street before reaching London Bridge. With high winds at work that day, burning embers were carried across to the other side of the Thames setting alight the buildings on the northern end of London Bridge. The inferno spread quickly into the City of London.

The greatest loss of life occurred on the bridge itself, as people from the northern end ran to help those fleeing from the south, everyone become trapped as the blaze had engulfed both sides of the river. With wooden homes and shops built along the stone bridge, it wasn’t long until the fire came for those trapped. Anyone who didn’t die in the flames, jumped into the Thames and either drowned in the river, or was crushed to death on overloaded rescue boats.

 

Modern Fire Safety Shouldn’t be Overlooked

 

Usually fire dangers within houses and apartments are not obvious to the naked eye, often concealed within walls, roofs, or elsewhere on the property. Older homes are especially prone to needing rewiring, or new switchboards installed to keep up to date with fire precaution regulations.

If you own a home, or are looking to move into a new (or, older) place, or buy an investment property, then give yourself peace of mind and have your home electricals and smoke alarms assessed for fire safety in the lead-up to National Fire Alarm Day on 18th October.

, , , ,

JANISSARY BARRACKS

Meet the Reenactors 2016

JANISSARY BARRACKS

janissary barracks

Janissary Barracks (‘Yeniҫeri Ocaği’) Historical Re-enactment Group Inc. was formed in 1999 and incorporated in March 2004. This group aims to:

  1. Foster an environment in which the members can research, adopt and re-enact medieval Ottoman lifestyles.
  2. Provide a common meeting ground for those who are interested in the history of the medieval period of the Ottoman Empire of the late 15th century.
  3. Support educational activities concerning medieval lifestyles with particular emphasis on the medieval Ottoman world.
  4. Provide a means of liaison with other groups and individuals dealing with medieval Ottoman culture.

The Janissary Barracks group have actively participated in the annual Abbey Medieval Tournament every year since 1999. This group holds a unique and important place in this Tournament as it brings a Middle-Eastern flavour to a mainly European based tournament atmosphere, and highlights the importance of one of the major empires of medieval times, which is otherwise not usually well represented in re-enacting.

Over the years since 1999, the Janissary Barracks group have expanded their activities to include Ottoman Turkish oil wrestling, traditional folk dancing and cooking. Presentations are made on other aspects of Ottoman culture including history of weapons, coffee and costumes, with a more recent strong emphasis on traditional military archery. Group members can demonstrate techniques using re-curve bows which established the Janissaries as an elite fighting force.

Janissary Barracks things to do in the encampment

Come and see the Janissary Barracks encampment and participate in activities such as the Turkish Oil Wresting and traditional folk dancing. 

Buy your tickets to the Festival today!

, , ,

HORSES, HOUNDS, HUNTERS AND FARMERS

Meet the Reenactors 2016

HORSES, HOUNDS, HUNTERS AND FARMERS

hounds bog

Horses, Hounds, Hunters and Farmers is a brand  new multi period reenactment group that has been established to show the animals and people in non warfare roles in the dark and middle ages. Horses, Hounds, Hunters and Farmer (HHHAF) gleefully borrow people and their animals from many of the fine re-enactment groups that attend the Abbey medieval festival to join us in showcasing kit, knowledge and, of course, awesome animals!

HHHAF strive to have a range of friendly and safe animals (though just horses and hounds this year!) that people can ask questions about, and gain an education on the animals roles and their equipment in medieval and dark ages. Visitors to the Abbey Festival this year can touch and feed their animals, and people too… but ask permission first!

You may see the HHHAF group members riding around Abbeystowe with their horses, or going on a hunt with their hounds around the Festival grounds. At their camp site this year, there will be horses to see, and hounds to marvel at! Hunters will prepare a rabbit for the dinner pot, horse equipment, saddles and bridles from different periods, a hunter talking about setting some snares, a chat about what medieval horses ate, and even a Noble Lord talking about on the medieval farming practices on the high middle ages. Please come over and say hello – they would love to meet you!

“HHHAF – we got Game” (and we ‘HHHAF’ terrible puns!)

Meet Horses, Hounds Hunters and Farmers, and their wonderful animals this year. Buy your tickets now!

Check back soon for another Reenactor group. 

, , ,

RAFNHEIM

Meet The Reenactors 2016

RAFNHEIM

rafnheim
The Rafnheim group was formed in 2010 after their founder Shane Ravenn left his previous Viking group in search of a new direction. Leaving the well populated Viking Age, he delved further back in time to the era before Viking expansion, but after the fall of the Roman Empire. This time was filled with many Germanic and Gothic tribes all vying for power, wealth, and glory.

Rafnheim means Raven Home, and Shane as Hraithmar Rafn (Hraithmar the Raven) has attracted other Living History enthusiasts to join an extended family of others who love the Migration Age of Europe. Members have personas spreading the length and breadth of the area recently vacated by Rome, from Gotland in the north and the Byzantines to the south, the Steppes nomad in the east and the trade hub of Jorvik to the west.

The time that the group portrays starts in the Year of Wolves in the winter of 406CE to 750CE. This is when the rivers froze and allowed for mass movement of people into the warmer and more fertile lands south of the frozen northlands, and ends before the pressures of the rising nationalities creating the Viking expansion.

The various tribes of the Germanic Iron Age had access to knowledge and skills left over from the Romans but forgotten by the time of the Vikings. The finds are rare, but filled with treasures and art beyond the ability of others to replicate for many centuries. Working towards this level of authenticity is difficult, but highly rewarding.

Rafnheim encampment activities

The Rafnheim group will be attending the Abbey Medieval Festival this year so pop in and meet them, and educate yourself on this fascinating time period.

Buy your tickets now to the Festival today!

Read more on the final round of Reenactors soon! 

, ,

Balsa Wood In Jousting

Whats the one GREAT thing a Jousting Tournament MUST HAVE?

 

Well, apart from horses, costumes, Knights, armour, and joust a plaisance (old jousting term for ‘friendly tournament’)… one of the greatest things a tournament must have is a lance!

After all, what’s more spectacular than seeing a wooden pole obliterated into a hundred pieces at high speed?

balsa joust

Pieces of balsa wood flying off in all directions in a cloud of timber splinters not only looks really cool, but lets the onlookers in the berfrois (old jousting term for ‘stands for the posh’) know who has made the strike – unless someone gets unhorsed.

And the great thing about using balsa wood for lance tips? It’s soft, explodes on impact and even breaks down to melt away into the soil in just a matter of days.

Historically, ash and oak were the jousting timbers of choice for Knights, but a hollowed out soft wood like pine was also used in tournaments to lessen the blow. And although European knights are usually credited with the use of lances, their use was widespread throughout Asia, the Middle East and North Africa whenever suitable mounts were available for use.

Balsa wood is a recently popularised wood compared to older Europeanbalsa wood plane timbers, coming to prominence in World War II when it was used as part of the construction of aeroplanes like the de Havilland Mosquito (pictured right).

balsa wood shipIn 1947, Norwegian explorer and writer Thor Heyerdahl set off on a raft made of this particular wood to cross the Pacific Ocean from South America to the Polynesian Islands. The raft was named after the Inca Sun God, Viracocha, for whom “Kon-Tiki” was said to be an old name (pictured left).

 

Today, balsa wood products are available online from Balsacentral.com in Adelaide. In fact they even sell Jousting sticks to Europe! The balsa trees are grown in tropical plantations using old cocoa bean and coffee lands where crops have failed. As a completely sustainable crop, balsa is widely used by the education, theatre, craft, art and modelling communities in all its various shapes and forms. But the best thing about balsa wood is… it makes the best lance tips for jousting tournaments!

See all of Balsa Centrals amazing products here. 

To see the Balsa wood tips in action, buy your tickets to the Festival and Joust Tournament now!

, ,

PRIMA SPADA

Meet the Reenactor Groups 2016

PRIMA SPADA SCHOOL OF FENCE

prima spada

Prima Spada School of Fence is a historical fencing school operating in Queensland, Australia. The School currently has three Salles (fencing halls) located in Brisbane, Maroochydore, and on the Gold Coast. Prima Spada take their school on the road, and will be another highly valued group attending and demonstrating their talents and skills at the Abbey Medieval Festival again this year.

Prima Spada School

Prima Spada is a founding member of the Australian Historic Swordplay Federation, now known as Western Martial Academies of Australia (WMAA). Based on the work of Spanish masters of the 16th and 17th centuries, Prima Spada teaches Renaissance European swordplay as a modern sport.

From the duelling swordplay of the 16th century, Prima Spada has created a challenging and enjoyable activity which can be appreciated at many different levels – as a martial skill, as a sport, or as a movement art. However, Prima Spada seeks to do more than simply reproduce the mechanics of duelling swordplay; the philosophical principles of honour and courtesy that were a fundamental part of the character of a 16th century noble, are also a key facet of what is taught in Prima Spada.

The practical and philosophical approach of Prima Spada creates an enjoyable and accessible form of swordplay where the emphasis lies firmly on quality of execution rather than brute strength or speed. This art resonates with dance movement, and is a unique, flamboyant combat style with a theatrical sensibility.

The Prima Spada style helps its students to develop considerable confidence in themselves and their abilities. From the very beginning, students are constantly challenged to excel at the techniques taught at their level, and encouraged to demonstrate their ability in stylised combat. This also requires one to accord the same respect to one’s fellow students. This is bourne out in School’s motto “Honourable in victory, gracious in defeat”.

See Prima Spada and witness this age old art of swordplay in action at this years Festival!

More on other Reenactors groups here soon! 

, , , , , , ,

Whats new to the Abbey Medieval Festival 2017?

New to the Abbey Medieval Festival 2017

This year we are living up to all expectations some incredible new program additions, authentic groups and amazing stall holders. We have a brand new Friday event – The Friday Joust Tourney – which will give you a very unique view of the festival.

  1. We have updated layout including a new re-enactment village called St. Edith’s Village
  2. Who likes archery? How about horseback archery?  Then you won’t want to miss   Medieval Horse Sports Australia and Knights of Camelot Horse Archery will be demonstrating Horseback Archery.  This incredibly exciting demonstration will feature Australian Horse Archery champions showcasing mounted skill at arms from  three of Australia’s Champion Horse Archers, and will  incorporate the use of bow, sword and lance.  Not to be missed!
  • The 16th century re-enactment group Condottieri will be debuting their new cannon
  • New re-enactment villages including:-
    • Crusader quarter –
    • Dark ages will be redesigning their layout to make an easier throuughfare for the public
  • Trebuchet  – you will not be disappointed

 

And there’s Finger Looping?

 

Anything else?….we will keep you posted.

The second new Village precinct is the “Crusaders Quarter” which will host specialist re-enactment groups. Here, for your entertainment and education, you can see shows and displays such as Bedouin Coffee Making, Cavalry Tactics and Horses: East Meets West talk, and a Lucet and Weaving Workshop.

new templars

Make sure you visit the Info Booth this year, as we will have a REAL SUIT OF ARMOUR on display. This armour was recently purchased by the Abbey Museum, and is originally from the 15th Century!

 

New in the VIP area is a 2 storey, ‘tudor’ themed viewing gallery for our special guests and Sponsors!

 

  • We have wonderful and very exciting addition to our jouster family with the announcement that we have a jouster travelling from France to compete for the Abbey Tournament Champion title!

new joust

 

The Festival is going green! We are determined to keep the festival as environmentally sustainable as possible, so we strongly encourage you to BYO water bottles.  There will be 4 Water Rehydration Stations for unlimited free re-fills.   However, we will be selling limited bottled water around the Festival, including at the St. Michael’s stall.

 

To see all this and much more, plus all the much loved shows and displays from previous years, buy your tickets now!

 

Subscribe to our newsletter to be the first to hear about all things Festival!