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Volunteering – for your own benefit!

volunteer

Abbey Museum volunteers at The Abbey Medieval Banquet

 

5 ways that volunteering can benefit you!

 

Some people might argue that you dont’ get anything out of volunteering and it’s only for people who have nothing to do!

Well that couldn’t be further from the truth!

Who’s looking for a fun way to add a new layer (yes, like the onion description in  Shrek) to your life, build up resilience and get feel like to you that you really want to feel like.

Get active!  Get alive!   and get that awesome happy Seratonin feeling that you may have been missing for a while for whatever reason.

We have some wonderful volunteers at the Abbey Medieval Festival, some of whom come back to us year after year.  This might explain why!

 

What contributing to your community can do for you!

  • Are you between jobs? – use your time to volunteer and keep your skills up to date.
  • Are you recovering from illness? If you can’t commit to a full time job yet, use your time to volunteer and build up strength and stamina until you are fully fit again
  • Are you new to the area? Consider volunteering to make friends and contacts to help you feel connected with your community
  • Put that  smile on your dial – where it belongs! – There’s nothing like giving to make you feel better
  • Oh and here’s one, if you are fed up on on-line dating……why not give volunteering a go to see if you can meet some ‘real’ people.

 

Volunteering for the  Abbey Medieval Festival is and incredible experience.  It’s not just fun, it’s educational.  Applications are now open – apply here!

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Archery Skirmish! This will get them away from their screens!

Medieval Archery – with a modern twist!

 

archeryArchery has been a tool and skill humans have been using since the Stone Age.  By the Middle Ages it was extremely important for all men to be practiced in archery. This is shown by a Law passed in England in 1252 stating that all men aged between 15 and 60 must have a bow and arrows of their own.  And not only in England, who remembers the story of William Tell!  William Tell

 

While archery may not be the force (pardon the pun) today as it was back then,  what child (big and little) doesn’t want to have a go.   And if I was a betting person I’d wager there may even be  subliminal Physics Class lurking in the background too!     Parents, think of this as hands-on-learning.  Don’t worry, they’ll be safe!

New to this year’s ‘Kids Dig it’ Medieval Family Fun Week.

That is why we are introducing a new element of archery to our ‘Kids Dig It’ Medieval Family Fun Week in 2017.  We are very excited to introduce XFire Games’ Archery Skirmish.  Yes, its Skirmish, but with arrows!!
Archery Skirmish is the latest in XFire Games’ Next Gen sports, lending itself to people who need to “feel” the true sense of a battle.   So in the Spirt of all things experiential, we just had to have it!  Appropriate for children aged from 12 and up, this high-adrenaline sport which helps encourage team work, hand/eye coordination, fitness and achievement is sure to be a winner!  So tell your kids its out with the Sedentary Screen Time and in with the Bows and Arrows!
XFire Games equipment is cutting edge when it comes to Archery Skirmish, the bows are strung to 30 pounds  (no metric when it comes to the laws of Force with archery)  so you know when you’ve been hit.  But, guess what, you wont’ have the bruising like in paintball.  The face masks not only look cool but keep your  face out of reach from those pesky arrows.

And the arrows, with their patent foam patent tip, are able to travel over a 35m distance with precision accuracy… so if you find yourself staring down the stems of an opponent’s arrow, get ready to move quickly!

We know your kids are going to love this event, so book now!

Quest Sponsor Blog: How Medieval People Got Their Daily News

Quest newspaper logo

Nowadays, staying up-to-date with the latest news is easy. With constant access to social media, smartphones, TV, newspapers and other technology, we only have to click a button or flick through some pages to find out everything we want to know. But have you ever stopped to wonder what life would have been like in the medieval era when daily newspapers and technology didn’t exist?

Proudly sponsored by Quest Community News, the Abbey Medieval Festival will be an experience like no other! Set out on a quest to the historical Abbeystowe in Caboolture to experience authentic re-enactments, banquets, jousting, roving entertainment, food and market stalls, medieval activities plus much more. Come and experience what it was like to live in a world without printed newspapers and technology!

 

Learn about the Messengers and the Scribes of the Middle Ages

In the Middle Ages, news was communicated very differently compared to news today. Messengers were often used in the medieval era. They would travel across the land to communicate the messages of the king or queen to others. Rumours were also very common in the medieval era – many people would talk and gossip in their villages and these rumours would quickly spread via word of mouth.

News was also communicated in visual ways during the Middle Ages. In ordinary life and in battle, medieval people often used particular clothing, designs, badges or banners to visually communicate information to other people. Badges, banners, clothing, coat of arms on shields and certain colours were often used to communicate one’s social status to friends and enemies. These also acted as a form of news – certain clothes, badges or colours could represent particular events or changes to social status. Scribes also played an important role in communicating news during the Middle Ages. Using medieval ink or knives, scribes would often communicate news on parchment and animal skin or carve messages into stones.

 

The Quest for Knowledge

Passing on their in-depth knowledge of messengers, scribes, and the communication of daily news in the Middle Ages, there will be more than 1000 professional re-enactors in attendance at Abbey Medieval Festival on July 8 and July 9 to help you enjoy a truly authentic medieval experience. With each professional re-enactor having high levels of expertise in their particular Medieval field, spend the day learning from them about the symbolic meanings behind certain coat of arms, have a go at manuscript writing, view the stalls containing medieval artwork and beautiful calligraphy, and listen to stories about the role of messengers and scribes.

 

Numerous encampments will be set up around the festival grounds for those who want to listen to medieval tales by an open fire or experience how medieval people lived. There will even be fashion parades on both days and plenty of people in medieval costume so you can see for yourself how medieval people used clothing to visually communicate news to others!

 

Want to be part of the news?

Needed an extra excuse to don your Medieval best? Grab your finest threads and head over to the Quest stall in Downtown Abbey to get yourself on the front page of your very own Quest newspaper!

Want to share your front page online? Make sure to use the hashtag #QuestNews and #abbeyfestival2017

To keep yourself informed with the latest news from around the region, visit the Quest Community News website, or flick through their latest edition.

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Planning and preparation for your festival weekend

 

 

 

ticket prices

 

 

Planning your festival weekend

We are receiving lots of great questions about specific festival details which we are very happy that you are asking as it means you are planning ahead for a fantastic weekend.  Naturally, we in turn are  also very happy to answer your queries to the best of our ability and experience.  Be sure to read our FAQ’s which may have the information you need already.    Remember hats and sunscreen are a must, so don’t forget to Slip, Slop, Slap!  In addition, here’ are a few more tips to keep in mind in your planning process

  • Bring Cash – Anyone who has been to our festival before will know that every year we struggle with connectivity.  We are making some exciting progress for a great solution this year, however please still prepare to bring CASH.  We will keep you posted!
  • Did you know that you may need a weapon’s permit for some of your children’s toy weapons or for weapons purchased at the festival.  See this list below.  Please remember that these guidelines comply with Australian Standards of Health and Safety, so we don’t  just make them up!  And if you decide you need a permit, apply here!  Permits will also be available from ‘The Sheriff of Abbeystowe’ during the weekend, located near to the main gates.
Item Permitted? Permit Required?
Latex foam rubber sword YES YES
Latex foam rubber sword (metal bar inside) YES YES
Foam LARP sword YES YES
Plastic sword YES NO
Dagger YES YES
Blunt re-enactment sword in a loop attached to belt YES YES
Cardboard or plastic look alike axe/ sword YES NO
Unsharpened axe in holder YES YES
Toy crossbow (wooden with rubber tips) On approval by the Sheriff YES
Toy bow (wooden with rubber tips) On approval by Sheriff YES
Blunt metal knife YES YES
Purchasing a weapon on the day and adding to their outfit YES YES
Unsharpened spear NO N/A
Bow and arrows together NO N/A

 

  • Water – Keeping our festival green – In the interest of our beautiful environment, we strongly encourage you to bring your own re-fillable water bottles.  Water will be available freely at water stations throughout the festival.  However, we understand that bottles are lost and forgotten and the weather can be hot.  Therefore, water will be on sale from a number of water peddlers, including St. Michael’s school stall.
  • Did you know that your joust ticket comes with a pre-show?  So get to the jousting arena at least 45 minutes early!
  • There aren’t that many opportunities to see real and wonderful stained glass in our lives – so check your program and don’t miss the Abbey Church stained glass tours.
  • If you are travelling south-bound on the Bruce Highway, your exit is #157 “Donnyborook, Toorbul’.
  • If you are travelling north-bound on the Bruce Highway, your exit is #152, the Bribie Island exit.
  • If you have a GPS find ‘THE ABBEY PLACE’  (and not Abbey Place)!
  • Did you know, there are free shuttle buses from Caboolture Train Station? Starting from 7.15 and running every half hour.  Last bus leaves tournament at 5.15pm. – Get ahead of traffic!
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Jouster Blog Series – Katherine McWade

Jouster Katherine McWade heraldryName:  Lady Katherine McWade

Motto:  ‘I can, I will, Watch Me!

Heraldry:  Lady Katherine’s  symbol of the Phoenix rising from the ashes shows her determination to succeed no matter what obstacles are  before her. She jousts in 14th centurKatherineMcWade-Shieldy armour. Her motto is “I Can, I Will, Watch Me”

Career highlights:  During a recent skill at arms competition,  she was awarded the “Herald’s Choice for Best Rider.  Lady Katherine’s combat experience spans the ages including both the valiant Australian Light Horse of the 20th Century and the gritty determination of the 14th Century medieval warrior.

Did you know:  Lady Katherine is a genuine ‘Chevalerie‘, personifying the virtues and true horsemanship that became chivalry as we know it today

And there’s more…Lady Katherine is trained as a Equine Myofunctional Therapist (horse masseuse) and has  ridden and trained horses all her life.  She has competed to the highest levels in many disciplines including show jumping at World Cup shows and Equestrian Australia Eventing.

Lady Katherine’s horse:  Lady Katherine will be riding Kit, a very quirky thoroughbred–stock horse cross.  When not jousting Kit and Lady Katherine are training high school classical dressage, competing in HRCAV, working equitation, show-jumping, skill at arms and marching through the streets of Melbourne as part of the Light Horse.

So why don’t you book your tickets here to see Lady Katherine fulfill her motto at the Abbey Medieval Festival!

Katherine McWade riding

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Jouster Blog Series – Sir David Williamson

Name:  Sir David Williamson,

Jouster David Williamson

Motto:   Adapt and Overcome

Did you know: Sir David is a full time dairy farmer and also a member of Kryal Castles mounted Knights. He is also one of the world’s youngest serving knights, having first jousted at the age of 17. Sir David has competed and been successful in various tournaments since beginning his career in 2015 at Kryal castle, including winning the Victorian goldfields medieval faire 2016 and runner up in the 2017 fair, runner up in the Keith Ryal memorial joust 2016 and 2017.

And there’s more….Sir David has recently returned from his first international tournaments, where he travelled to the far kingdom of America to compete with Sir Charlie Andrews and the “Knights of Mayhem”. While jousting in the USA, he did not miss a single lance pass over six shows in three weekends. Sir David has will travel over 1000km from the Victorian town of Ballarat to be at the Abbey Medieval Festival, and along for the journey, his war horse “Buster”, a 6 year old purebred Quarter horse David has owned for 3 years now.

In September,  Sir David will travel back to America to compete it the annual Estes Park  international “Heavy Armour” solid lance style joust tournament.

Career Highlights:   Sir David won the Victorian Goldfields Medieval Faire, and was runner-up in Keith Ryal memorial joust.  2017 will mark his first international tournament, when he travels to America to compete in solid jousting.

Heraldry: DW heraldry

 

 

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Jouster Blog Series – Sir Anthony Hodges

Jouster Tony Hodges-photo

Name:   Sir Anthony (Tony Hodges)

Motto:  ‘non ad iniuriam facere ius’  ‘It’s never wrong to do right’

Heraldry: 

Jouster Sir Anthony heraldry

 

 

 

 

Did you know:   Sir Anthony, a skilled Jouster,  has a lifetime of competing and training horses in  several different disciplines.  He is a member of the Kryal Castle Mounted Knights team in Australia since 2014, where Sir Anthony trains with the accomplished and well known knights  Sir Phillip Leitch, Sir Cliff Marisma, Sir David Williamson and Sir Justin Holland.

And there’s more:   Sir Anthony also  runs training days for riders and their horses in skill-at arms, joust, general horsemanship and other disciplines.  He has now added International status to his achievements due to a recent invite from Sir Charlie Andrews to Sonora Celtic Faire in the United States.  This  style of jousting is known as ‘heavy jousting’ with solid lances.  His aim is to ride that perfect pass and feel the perfect break of the lance.

Career Highlights:  

Winner: 2015  Skill at Arms Timeline festival

Winner:  2016  Iron Fest Joust

4th place: Sonora Celtic Faire USA 2017Jouster Sir Anthony

Top 5: Goldfields Medieval Faire 2016

3rd place:  Abbey Medieval Festival Australia  2016

 

So to see Sir Anthony’s skill as a jouster live at the Abbey Medieval Festival, book here!

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Abbey Medieval Festival Sponsor MBRIT examines Medieval Tourism

MBRIT Tourism

 

 

 

 

JOUSTING TOURNAMENTS WERE A FORM OF TOURISM IN MEDIEVAL TIMES 

Noblemen and noblewomen, the most exciting season of the year has almost arrived – tournament season that is! Spectators from lands near and far will be travelling from their castles and villages to Moreton Bay Region this July to relive history and witness one of the greatest sporting tournaments to ever exist – the Abbey Medieval Festival jousting tournament! Jousting tournaments were the most prestigious events on the medieval social calendar throughout the Middle Ages and medieval people would often flock to every tournament to watch the knights battle and show off their combat skills to the crowd. Moreton Bay Region Industry & Tourism is a proud sponsor of the Abbey Medieval Festival, and is very excited about the tourism that events like Abbey provide to the region. The jousting sessions are one of the draw cards for Abbey Medieval Festival and are events you definitely do not want to miss! Jousting sessions are ticketed events that will draw many other nobles to the Abbey Medieval Festival on July 8 and 9. Make sure you and your friends secure a spot in the Jousting Tournament grandstand so you can cheer on your favourite knight in shining armour and tell them to ‘break a lance’!

 

 Jousting as a tourism experienceJousting and the significance of jousting tournaments

 

Jousting was a medieval sport that involved knights charging at each other on horseback. Participating in the tournaments was often their way of earning respect and admiration from the crowd. Crowds would travel from great distances to the tournaments to watch the knights for entertainment purposes – as winning or losing a jousting tournament would often affect a knight’s social status and be a popular topic of conversation after the tournament. Tournaments were a great way for boosting tourism through medieval towns and villages as many people would travel far distances to witness these spectacles.

 Who attended jousting tournaments?

Jousting tournaments in the medieval era were attended by many people of varying social status. Considered to be one of the most important events to attend, many people of royalty would travel to jousting tournaments. Their appearance at such an event was a sign of support to knights, some of whom they may have entered into the tournament to represent their families. Merchants and families predominantly from the noble class would also travel to jousting tournaments to watch the thrilling action unfold. Because of the number of people in attendance, these events helped to support local merchants sell their wares and the greater local economy.

Even more jousting from the Abbey Medieval Festival

So because jousting tournaments were a well loved feature in medieval times, Queensland is proud to bring even more  jousting to you in 2017!  New on the program for this year’s Abbey Medieval Festival,  is the additional Friday afternoon joust tourney.  So you not only have a chance to see jousting on the Saturday and Sunday, but now on Friday 7th July,  gates open at 1.30pm  for as special behind the scenes view of a pre-constructed  Abbey Medieval Festival.  With limited seating, this event will offer patrons – in the spirit of a truly personal tourism experience –  a unique chance to get up close and personal with medieval  jousters.  The rest of the grounds will be off-limits, so prepare a list of questions that you’ve always wanted to ask a Jouster and make this tourism experience your opportunity to interact with a Medieval Knight.  Huzzah!  Get tickets here!

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Jouster Blog Series – Lady Elizabeth Brown

Liz Brown JoustJousters competing at the 2017 Abbey Medieval Festival 

Welcome again to our Jouster blog series.  Every week,we feature the wonderful Jousters competing at this year’s festival.  This is a great opportunity for you to get to know our participants,  a little about their background, skill and abilities.  Keep posted!

 

Name:  Lady Elizabeth Brown

 

Heraldry:  Lady Elizabeth’s colours are magenta and blue and her shield bears the Cross of St Columb, Cornwall, England

Did you know:  Lady Elizabeth has been involved with the Abbey Medieval Tournament for over 10 years, supplying and training  the amazing horses that we see each year.    She is more well known for being the Head Marshall.   Lady Elizabeth first took to the field in 2009 and then returned in 2016, when she was the highest hitting female jouster.  She is the owner of Moonlight Manor Horse Riding.

And there’s more:  Lady Elizabeth is also a horse riding instructor, riding in Equestrian disciplines, teaching in Greenbank, South Brisbane.   The Lady Elizabeth hails from England, Canada and Australia and could in fact, represent all three countries.

 

To see the Lady Elizabeth and our other fantastic jousters, don’t forget to book you tickets here.

 

 

 

 

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Jouster Blog Series – Ecuyer Le Marquis

Jouster Ecuyer Le Marquis

Jousters competing at the 2017 Abbey Medieval Festival

 

Welcome once again to our Jouster Blog series.   Each week we feature a jouster, some you will be familiar with, some not so.   This week we are very proud to feature our international jouster.    This is a great opportunity for you to get to know our participants,  a little about their background, skill and abilities and jouster spirit!  Keep posted!

 

 

Name:  Ecuyer Le Marquis ( Michael Sadde)

 

Motto:  ‘pro rege saepe, pro patria semper’ – ‘For king often, for country always.

 

Heraldry:Jouster Michael Sadde

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Did you know:  Sir Michael, one of our international Jousters at the Abbey Medieval Festival in 2017, was born in France, began competing in jousting competitions in 2009 and has participated in international tournaments around the world, including Belgium, France, Poland, Italia, England, Australia, United States, Canada, Russia, and Denmark.  His first time to Australia, this  former rider of the Republican Guard at Paris, and is now a professional jouster.  He is the organizer of the Tournament of the Order of Saint Michel in solid lances and President of the ‘écuyers de l’histoire’  leading a team of 25 members.

 

Don’t miss the opportunity to meet Sir Michael and our other jousters at the Friday afternoon joust.  Book your tickets here!

 

 

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Jouster Blog Series – Sir Luke Binks

Luke Binks

 

 

Name: Sir Luke Binks

Born – 01/07/1981
Motto: Deeds not words – Factis non verbis

Heraldry: Yellow and BlackJouster Heraldry Luke Binks

Did you know: Luke has been a Jouster since 2001.  He is a professional reproduction armourer and the owner of Red Hart Reproductions.

Horse:  Luke will be riding Mayville Lodge Sincero, a twelve year old Andalusian Stallion and 2017  Abbey Medieval Festival will be this horse’s first tournament.

 

Did you know: Luke was born in Warwick, Queensland and developed a love for all things medieval from a very early age and was particularly inspire by Ivan Hoe, Excalibur and Robin Hood movies. From the age of eight, he was either playing with Knight Lego, making wooden swords, jousting from his bicycle or hunting rabbits with his bow.  At 14 Luke joined a re-enactment group and learned to fight in real armour with real weapons, further furling the flames.  At 21, Luke bought his first horse and learned to ride and fight from horse-back.  It was around this time that Luke started his business as a professional armourer.

And there’s more: 16 years later, Luke has not stopped.  He has traveled the world jousting and has been a pioneer for the Australian and global jousting community. He has jousted in Australia, New zealand, Belgium, Holland, France, England, Denmark, Germany, Switzerland, USA, Norway, Sweden and Russia.

Career Highlights:  Luke was the first and only Australian ever to have been invited to joust at the Sword of Honour tournament held at the Royal Armouries  of England.  He was also one of three knights in the world to re-introduce jousting with authentic historical lances.  He has lived and trained jousters and jousting horses on three different continents,  all the whilepursuing his career as an armourer.  Luke has won many titles in his long and illustrious career in medieval tournaments but loves nothing more than making accomplishments at home on his own horses and team mates.

To see this amazing Jouster, Sir Luke, please book your tickets here.

 

 

 

 

 

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Jouster Blog Series – Amanda Challen

Jousters competing at the 2017 Abbey Medieval Festival

Jouster Heraldry Lady Amanda Challen

In this series of blogs, every week, we feature the wonderful Jousters competing at this year’s festival.  This is a great opportunity for you to get to know our participants,  a little about their background, skill and abilities.  Keep posted!

 

Name : Lady Amanda Challen

Motto: Magnum vel domum ite (Go big or go home)

Heraldry: Per fess quartered dancettu azure and argent

Did you know? This will be Amanda’s second year competing as Jouster at the Abbey Medieval Festival.  Amanda Challen is a Brisbane local, hailing from Strathpine.  Born in Canberra, Amanda never quite grew out of “that horse phase” and while she is relatively new to the jousting scene, her skills have been twenty-six years in the making.   Amanda has broken-in and trained many horses in an array of different disciplines such as competitive trail-riding, show-jumping, dressage, mustering, and droving.   Amanda started out just as a trail rider, moved onto droving and then became a riding instructor.

When not sewing costumes, training horses and researching things historical –  Amanda works for Queensland Racing as Sample Collection Officer.

Horse:  Nyx  – Amanda’s horse ‘Nyx’ has a fondness for bells on her  harness,  which serve as a musical warning when riding out.
Jouster Lady Amanda ChallenAmanda’s interest in jousting started with Nyx’s sire – Fenris, who graced the Saint Michael’ s tourney field for many years.  Nyx is the only horse Amanda has bred and the first horse she’s trained in jousting.  Nyx is 7 years old this year and stands at 16.1 hands high.  Nyx is approximately 652Kg and  is a Percheron cross Clydesdale.  Nyx tends to get quite upset if she misses out on any jousting, so much so that in 2016, not only did Nyx carry Amanda carefully and safely through her first joust, Nyx also carried Sir Luke for  three of his four runs as well.  Nyx was then invited to be used as a jousting mount at the St Ives international joust in September 2016,  where once again she proved herself as competent Jouster.

Nyx and Amanda became Mounted Marshall for the jousting spectacular at the end of 2014, when Nyx’s enthusiasm and calm demeanour, led to Nyx to be invited to be used as a jousting horse for the Abbey 2015.  At this tournament, Nyx carried an array of knights including Sir Cliff, Lady Vikki, Sir Justin and Sir John.  While the knights didn’t come to blows over who got to ride her, it was a close thing!

The following year they were both invited back as jousters:  Amanda’s first jousting tournament.

So,  if you would like to see Amanda, and other amazing Jousters at this year’s festival, click here to get your tickets !

 

 

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Jouster Blog Series – Justin Holland

Jousters competing at the 2017 Abbey Medieval Festival

In this series of blogs, every week, we feature the wonderful jousters competing at this year’s festival.  This is a great opportunity for you to get to know our participants,  a little about their background, skill and abilities.  Keep posted!

 

Jouster Justin Holland

Jouster Justin Holland

Name:     Justin Holland

 

Motto:      Invictus in Animo  (Unconquered in Spirit)

 

Heraldry: Trois argent fleur de lys, gules ( three white Fleur de Lys on a red field)

 

Did you know?      Justin is one of the progenitors of the modern sport of jousting in Australia, and has  been jousting since 1996, and since then has jousted in most states of Australia, as well as New Zealand, Belgium, France and Poland.

Justin was hired to set up and train the joust team for the new Kryal Castle, Ballarat, in 2012.

Justin now runs Nova Hollandia Entertainment, a historical education and entertainment company in NSW

And there’s more…. Justin has a B.A. Hons in Classical Studies and Latin.  He is one of only six  people to have jousted in Tasmania, and the first!  He personally floated two horses to the Abbey Tournament in 2013 from Ballarat, Victoria….a round Heraldry for Justin Hollandtrip of 4000km!  He has been runner up at the Abbey Tournament 7 times!

Career highlights:  Abbey Medieval Festival Jouster champion 2006, 2012, 2014, and 2016.  Champion Jouster of Castle Gniew, Poland 2010

 

 

So,  if you would like to see Justin, and other amazing Jousters at this year’s festival, click here to get your tickets !

 

 

 

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The Friday Joust Tourney – new to 2017 Abbey Medieval Festival

Friday Joust Abbey Medieval Festival 2017

 

 

Friday Afternoon Joust Tourney.

The Friday Afternoon Joust is not only a joust spectacular, which will delight in itself, but it will be a ‘behind the scenes’ look at the  making of the festival.

Up-close and personal, our Friday event will be an opportunity for you to see the jousting over a period of 2-3 hours, experience the thrill of the joust competition and get a feel for the festival – before the gates open the next morning.

While the joust will be as grand as a joust can be, with the smell of horses, the vision of  knights in shining armour, the roaring of the crowds, we would also like to expose the experience as an honest pre-construction of what actually goes on behind the scenes every year: the festival folk will still be in the throes of getting prepared,  a lot of hard work will still be going on.  We think this is a perfect opportunity to come experience a snap-shot of the festival, particularly for our senior citizens who might find the excitement of the full-days at the tournament too much.  This is a shortened and toned- down mini version of the tournament.

You will have an amazing opportunity to get up close and personal with some of our national and international jousters, so prepare your questions and follow our upcoming blogs regarding these amazing Jousters.

Gates open at 1.30, for a 2.30 start.  Snacks and drinks will be on sale throughout the afternoon, with the evening drawing to a close around 5.00pm.  From the Eastern Grandstand entry, groups of guests will be escorted to the jousting arena.  There, you will have the opportunity to witness international and Australian jousts.

The rest of the grounds will be still under construction, and therefore no access will be allowed to anywhere else on the grounds apart from the joust arena.  Our re-enactors and encampments will still be busy putting finishing touches to their amazing displays, so we cannot have them disturbed!

Tickets need to be pre-purchased, so book your seats quickly as we have a feeling they won’t last.

 

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LAST MINUTE TIPS!

Tips and Tricks when planning for the Abbey Medieval Festival!

 

Yellow Shield

  • Ticket sales close on Thursday 6th at midnight!  If you’re not in by then, prepare to line up at the gate!
  • If you are using a GPS to get to the Festival, use Abbey Medieval Festival as your destination OR Old Toorbul Point Pt Caboolture – this is where is car park entrance is.
  • The Sponsors Village (outside the festival site) will be the last place you can by a Coke or Softdrink for 600 years!  Program sales, a Kombi photo station and much more!
  • Please keep a really good eye on your kiddies! We hate to see any kids missing their parents, (and vice versa) but if that does happen, we do have the security and a Sheriff’s tent tent just inside the main gates,  so come and see us there.
  • The Prepaid ticket lane is the to Right Hand side of the road when you arrive at the Gates, and yes, there are still many more tickets to be bought on the day! –
  • There have been a few mozzies around lately so pack that mozzie spray!
  • Gates open at 8:45am, so get here early to be at the front of the queue, so you can make the most out of your day! 
  • Dont forget to SHARE YOUR FUN! Abbey Festival Facebook and Instagram at #abbeyfestival2017  #visitmoretonbayregion #thisisqueensland #medievalstory
  • Whether you are a volunteer or a VIP – please stick your parking permit on the windscreen so that it can easily be read by the parking marshals (the dashboard doesn’t work with sun-glare!)
  • No alcohol on sale before 10.00 – please observe Queensland laws – we do!

 

Most of all HAVE A GREAT DAY!!

 

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Medieval to Modern Transportation

Medieval to Modern Transportation – the Industrial Revolution and Beyond

While today we travel at great speed covering vast cross-country, or cross-continent distances within hours via plane, train, or automobile, Medieval peoples travelled far slower covering far less of a distance and none could have dreamt of the dawn of modern transportation experienced eons after their time had ended, burgeoning during the first industrial revolution and picking up speed during the technological revolution.

The evolution of primitive transportation to the modern transportation modes we have at our disposal today, thanks to brilliant minds such as aviation pioneers the Wright brothers Orville and Wilbur, steam engine tramway inventor Richard Trevithick, or car industry pioneers the Renault brothers Louis, Marcel and Fernand, would have been inconceivable to the people of the Middle Ages.

This was a time period in which travel by foot was the most common way of journeying across the land for the majority of people. Horses, donkeys, mules and oxen pulled carts were generally reserved for royalty and the wealthier classes who could afford such luxuries, as well as more well-off traders dealing in such transport goods as wool, and some other Medieval folk such as knights, diplomats/envoys and mounted soldiers.

Travel through History – Where did People in the Middle Ages Journey?

Most peasants travelled within a very small radius upon their King’s land, as far as to the nearest market to buy food, or to work, and then home again. Farmers would venture as far as to the nearest village to sell their produce. As peasants belonged to the land they were born upon, they had to receive permission from their King before leaving their King’s domain.

The noble classes would travel further, between their vast estates and on occasion further still for special events. Pilgrims and knights would venture far and wide and merchants would often opt for water travel by ship (equipped with sails, or rowed by men) to access foreign markets to sell their wares across the known world and bring back exotic goods.

 Travel through History – The Problem with Medieval Period Land Transport

European road networks ingeniously established by the Romans, fell into disrepair after Rome’s fall. What were once well maintained overland routes quickly turned to muddy tracks during winter and at best, uneven dirt paths throughout the rest of the year.

As overland roads were severely damaged (until around the 12th century when road rehabilitation began) and travel by land required extensive leg work, or access to horse, mule, donkey, oxen and/or carts, along with coin for tolls, tips, lodging, food, veterinaries (if an animal was used) and more, water travel proved by far the quickest, cheapest and most efficient option for transporting goods, especially for longer journeys.

Travel through History in Medieval Times How Fast Could People Journey?

Whilst the average Medieval peasant could walk at approx. 3 miles per hour, covering a mile every 20 minutes, professional couriers could trek up to 31, or 38 miles a day by foot! A horse could travel up to 40 to 60 miles a day before requiring a rest, whereas a cart pulled by oxen (depending upon the weight of the load and quality of the cart) could travel up to 10 miles per day, and a horse pulled cart 20.

It wasn’t until the bridging years between the Late Middle Ages and Early Renaissance period when human patronage of carts increased due to the improvement of roads coupled with the introduction of primitive carriage suspension technology and by the 15th Century, ships were built with 3 masts.

Medieval Period Transportation Improvements were Key to Fostering a New Age of More Modern Transportation

Like the first and second industrial revolution, transportation was vital to social improvement, economic prosperity and European development during the Medieval period. The burgeoning transportation innovations of the Middle Ages and the discovery of the Americas helped bring about the booming economy enjoyed by the eras thereafter.

Similarly, echoing the benefits brought about by Medieval advancements, more modern transportation developments harnessed up until around the First World War also sparked a period of vast social, economic and technological improvement across primarily Europe, Britain and America.

The First and Second Industrial (Technological) Revolution Sparked the Evolution of Modern Transportation

In 1898, Louis Renault invented his first car – the Voiturette, along with the direct drive gearbox which greatly improved driving efficiency, allowing for noise reduction, higher torque at lower RPM, along with more advantages as well. Amongst other Renault accomplishments with his brothers through their Renault company, they adopted modernised automobile principles to improve car design and ultimately evolve this mode of road transport.

By 1907 50% of London’s taxis were Renault’s.

Much like the Medieval wooden ships such as the Galley, Trade-Cog and longboats of the Vikings, which were used as both vessels to move goods and people, as well as vessels to transport soldiers and/or wage high-seas warfare, 500 of Renault’s taxis were used during World War I to transport troops to impede the Germans advance upon Paris in 1914.

Car usage increased after WWII and by 1959 around 32% of British families owned a car.

Today people travel by car, plane, train, bus, ship and even space shuttle. The transport modes which will likely be pioneered eons from now, will probably be just as inconceivable to us, 21st century folk, as Louis Renault’s the Voiturette would be to the Medieval peoples.

As the Frenchman Jean-Baptiste Alphone Karr once wrote during the Industrial Revolution: “the more things change, the more they stay the same”…

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Kids In Crowds

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The Abbey Medieval Festival is Australia’s largest and most popular Festival of its kind. Whilst this in itself is an amazing accomplishment, it can also be a HUGE worry on the minds of parents and carers.

Being parents ourselves, we know that losing your child ANYWHERE is a parents worst nightmare. The Festival has procedures in place to return lost children to their parents in the quickest way possible, and we have also put together this list of some clever tips and tricks for you to hopefully avoid what can be a horrible situation.

TIP 1:

Before you arrive at the Festival, familiarise yourself with the map of the grounds. Know where the information desk is, as well as the security tent and the first aid station. Any lost kids who are found will be brought up to the security tent (near the entrance), so if you find yourself in this position, this will be the first place you need to head.

lost kids

TIP 2:

If your child is too young to memorise their parents name and phone number, write it down on something they will have on them the whole day, where it cannot be lost or rubbed off. A great idea is to write on the tag of clothing, or in felt tip pen on the childs skin (hand, etc) and cover with clear nail polish. You can also write your name and number on a card (or use your business card) and stick it in their pocket.

lost kids

TIP 3:

Who doesnt love a good selfie? As soon as you arrive at the Festival, take a photo of your child, so you have a photo of what they are wearing, hair style, etc.

TIP 4:

Choose a big, obvious landmark, building or tent somewhere central in the Festival grounds and tell your child that if they are to lose you, they need to go to this particular spot. A good one for slightly older kids.

TIP 5:

We dont have to remind you about this, but always teach your children about stranger danger and safety. Triple Zero Hero is a great site that teaches kids about emergency services and the like.

lost kids

TIP 6:

Remember, almost everyone is willing to to help out someone in need. If you find yourself in this position, just ask any of the friendly volunteers, stall holders, reeanctors or security personnel and we will be more than willing to help.

 

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EX LIBRIS

Meet the Reenactor Groups 2016

EX LIBRIS

libris

Ex Libris is a Living History group which, as it’s primary focus, presents the middle and upper class peoples from Western and Central Europe, between 1375 and 1415. They have other areas of focus as well,  which include but are not limited to: late Antiquity and the Great Migrations, through to the Renaissance. They strive to present high quality individual historical impressions with a focus on education, living history and experimental archeology. This group and its members are looking to understand the medieval period by researching and recreating the fashions, cuisine, art and lifestyles.

While they are a small group, their activities include, but are not restricted to; research, practice and demonstration of historical martial arts, equestrian skills, religious practices, music, cooking, costuming, metal, ceramic, leather, and wood work, and other skills appropriate to the subject. Ex Libris has performed at medieval fairs, like the Abbey Medieval Festival, as well as participating in small private events, lectures and demonstrations. Several of their members write blogs and contribute to other medieval pages.

Ex Libris is made up of several experienced and dedicated researchers and re-enactors, with a combined experience and knowledge of over 50+ years. What they lack in size they make up for in in enthusiasm and dedication to history.

What will you see when you come into the Ex Libris camp?

libris

A hive of activity with and smiling faces ready to answer all your questions. Ex Libris has two unofficial mottos: No. 1: “No one goes away without having their questions answered”. No. 2: “Have fun!”

When you meet Ex Libris, you not only come away with a deep sense of their passion for history, but their excitement and dedication is infectious.

This camp is a must for all guests at this years Festival!

STILL more to come on the Reenactor groups