Banquet Subtlety

Banquet

A sumptuous feast…the Abbey Medieval Banquet

Not so Subtle is the banquet Subtlety

In the Middle Ages, a medieval banquet was a feast of epic proportions. The tables were laden with sumptuous and multitudinous dishes, an expression of a nobles wealth on display for all his guests to see.  Every day foods like pies, fruit and stews were accompanied by magnificent animals and birds such as peacock, geese and swans kept for such occasions.

A highlight at any medieval banquet was the presentation of a special sugar sculpture known as sotiltees (or subtleties).  Nobles would compete to have their cook create wonderful sculptures in all sorts of curious forms – castles, ships, animals, birds or scenes from ancient tales. The more spectacular and unexpected the sculpture was the better!  Another form of subtlety more common on the Continent was the ‘entremet’. This was traditionally an elaborate form of entertainment dish and included acted performances. You may recall the nursery rhyme “four and twenty blackbirds, baked in a pie” this was a form of “entremets”.

Abbey Medieval Banquet…food, more food and fun!

At the Abbey Medieval banquet, not only will guests dine on a variety of delicious medieval food and drink, they will also be richly entertained with music from Musica Prima, dance from Shuvani gypsies and other medieval mischief.  Phoenix Entertainment will present a fire display based around the story of St George and the Dragon.  Stories of dragons abound in the Middle Ages, they were often called ‘draco’ and portrayed fierce flying fire-breathing reptiles.  Definitely not trainable… well that is not until the advent of the modern movies!

The dragon theme will be seen throughout the banquet so keep your eyes pealed for our very own fire breathing, but very tame dragon subtlety.

There are still a small number of tickets available for this year’s medieval banquets. Check out our menu , it’s sure to make your mouth water!

Purchase your  banquet tickets now and join in this unique experience of medieval fun and festivities.

 

 

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