Quest Sponsor Blog: How Medieval People Got Their Daily News

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Nowadays, staying up-to-date with the latest news is easy. With constant access to social media, smartphones, TV, newspapers and other technology, we only have to click a button or flick through some pages to find out everything we want to know. But have you ever stopped to wonder what life would have been like in the medieval era when daily newspapers and technology didn’t exist?

Proudly sponsored by Quest Community News, the Abbey Medieval Festival will be an experience like no other! Set out on a quest to the historical Abbeystowe in Caboolture to experience authentic re-enactments, banquets, jousting, roving entertainment, food and market stalls, medieval activities plus much more. Come and experience what it was like to live in a world without printed newspapers and technology!

 

Learn about the Messengers and the Scribes of the Middle Ages

In the Middle Ages, news was communicated very differently compared to news today. Messengers were often used in the medieval era. They would travel across the land to communicate the messages of the king or queen to others. Rumours were also very common in the medieval era – many people would talk and gossip in their villages and these rumours would quickly spread via word of mouth.

News was also communicated in visual ways during the Middle Ages. In ordinary life and in battle, medieval people often used particular clothing, designs, badges or banners to visually communicate information to other people. Badges, banners, clothing, coat of arms on shields and certain colours were often used to communicate one’s social status to friends and enemies. These also acted as a form of news – certain clothes, badges or colours could represent particular events or changes to social status. Scribes also played an important role in communicating news during the Middle Ages. Using medieval ink or knives, scribes would often communicate news on parchment and animal skin or carve messages into stones.

 

The Quest for Knowledge

Passing on their in-depth knowledge of messengers, scribes, and the communication of daily news in the Middle Ages, there will be more than 1000 professional re-enactors in attendance at Abbey Medieval Festival on July 8 and July 9 to help you enjoy a truly authentic medieval experience. With each professional re-enactor having high levels of expertise in their particular Medieval field, spend the day learning from them about the symbolic meanings behind certain coat of arms, have a go at manuscript writing, view the stalls containing medieval artwork and beautiful calligraphy, and listen to stories about the role of messengers and scribes.

 

Numerous encampments will be set up around the festival grounds for those who want to listen to medieval tales by an open fire or experience how medieval people lived. There will even be fashion parades on both days and plenty of people in medieval costume so you can see for yourself how medieval people used clothing to visually communicate news to others!

 

Want to be part of the news?

Needed an extra excuse to don your Medieval best? Grab your finest threads and head over to the Quest stall in Downtown Abbey to get yourself on the front page of your very own Quest newspaper!

Want to share your front page online? Make sure to use the hashtag #QuestNews and #abbeyfestival2017

To keep yourself informed with the latest news from around the region, visit the Quest Community News website, or flick through their latest edition.